“puerto rico economy” – Google News: Spir Communication (SPI) Dipped -7.58% on Mar 17 | Thorold News – Thorold News

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Spir Communication (SPI) Dipped -7.58% on Mar 17 | Thorold News  Thorold News

Shares of Spir Communication (EPA:SPI) last traded at 3.17, representing a move of -7.58%, or -0.26 per share, on volume of 442 shares. After opening the.

“puerto rico economy” – Google News


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“puerto rico economy” – Google News: The Best 8 Ways To Use Korean Air SkyPass Miles – Simple Flying

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The Best 8 Ways To Use Korean Air SkyPass Miles  Simple Flying

If you’re a Korean Air SkyPass member looking to earn and spend more SkyPass miles this year, these are some of the best ways to do so.

“puerto rico economy” – Google News


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Saved Stories – Puerto Rico News: Don’t Let Mueller Restore Your Faith in the FBI

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Michael_Novakhov
shared this story
from Comments on: Don’t Let Mueller Restore Your Faith in the FBI.

The FBI has been under non-stop assault since the election of 2016 — first by Democrats who decried its eleventh-hour decision to restart the Clinton email investigation, then by Donald Trump with his firing of James Comey. The Bureau is currently portrayed in the mainstream media as a friend of justice, suggesting an image rehabilitation after its lawlessness was exposed in the mid-1970s. Already, we have witnessed Comey and Andrew McCabe — who oversaw the FBI in the critical period of 9/11 to 2018 — painted as brave truth-tellers, instead of the repressive law enforcement agents they were. One can anticipate more of this, especially with the prospect of release of Robert Mueller’s report.

Who are these people presented to us as heroes? And who will a re-legitimating of the FBI benefit?

The Agency’s Sordid History

Despite much focus on the FBI recently, the history of those who lead it and the nature of the organization has largely remained unexamined in the mainstream media. In the case of Mueller, for example, we are told much about his appointment as special counsel after Comey’s firing, but little about his role as FBI director during George W. Bush’s administration. It was during that time that the FBI repeatedly targeted Muslim communities with informant-sting operations which were then touted as successful efforts at stopping terrorism. At the same time, the government adopted the USA Patriot Act, which ushered in a new era of governmental repression and supplied the FBI with an array of new suppressive tools. Also obscured from contemporary discussion is Mueller’s putting the FBI stamp of approval on the myth of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq as a pretext for the murderous U.S. war there. In short, with all the waiting for Mueller’s report, what is too often ignored is his essential role in some of the most repressive and egregious undertakings of the U.S. over the past two decades. Mueller has already caused trouble for Trump, and this is certainly welcome, but that is no reason to lose perspective on who he actually is and the role he has played in U.S. history.

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This applies to Comey as well, who replaced Mueller as FBI director. In 2003, Comey was deputy attorney general under John Ashcroft. While he has often been hailed for refusing to sign off on a particular surveillance order during that time, less discussed is his role in facilitating torture. Comey himself is aware of his legacy, and is quite defensive, writing at length in his book that he did not want to become the “torture guy.” What comes through in his own account is that he knew torture, a crime against humanity, was being used by the U.S.; that his office had sanctioned it, and yet, aside from some internal pushback, he did nothing further to stop it. All of which is telling, not only of Comey personally, but of the agencies he led.

McCabe — who was promoted to the FBI’s top leadership first by Mueller, then Comey — does not carry that particular stain, though he was, amid standing controversy, a key player in the Clinton email affair. It is worth remembering the Bureau’s initial role during the election of 2016: When Comey was director and McCabe was deputy director, the FBI’s attention to Hillary Clinton appears to have been elevated to, or above, interest in a hostile foreign power intervening in a U.S. presidential election. In that respect, there is an argument to be made that McCabe, Comey and the FBI played a role in getting Trump elected, all of which ought to give pause to those lined up now in support of the Bureau.

This becomes even clearer when looking at the makeup of the agency. Beyond the fact that Mueller, Comey, McCabe and current FBI Director Christopher Wray are Republicans, the Bureau — unlike the rest of the U.S. — is overwhelmingly white and male. Further, the FBI has been known to attract a particularly conservative element — for example, recruiting from and attracting members of the Republican-inclined Church of Latter Day Saints (Mormons) and evangelical Christians. While that does not prove the Bureau is, by default, an ultra-conservative organization (officially it is supposed to be nonpartisan), it suggests the opposite of being middle-of-the-road, let alone progressively inclined.

Given all this, we find ourselves in a situation where people who had either despised or had a healthy skepticism of the FBI are now full of illusions about it. This is largely a consequence of Trump firing Comey in May 2017 — first under pretense of his handling of the Clinton email matter, and later, articulated specifically by Trump because of “this Russia thing.”

Comey’s firing, nonetheless, has brought us to this moment. It is becoming clearer that there is now agreement among a cohort of people within the power structure that Trump and his cronies’ machinations with the Russians during the election, and Trump’s obsequiousness to Vladimir Putin, are not going to stand unopposed. And this was given an important boost with the results of the 2018 election and its mass rejection of Trump and the core that supports him. This helps explain why, as McCabe reports in his book, the “Gang of Eight” congressional leaders did not push back when McCabe told them that the Bureau was launching a counterintelligence investigation against the president after Comey’s firing. It also explains why the Mueller investigation has gotten as far as it has, and why Trump is besieged by an unprecedented array of other investigations. With all this, there is a certain denouement looming — amid continuing contention — and it is worth anticipating what we will be left with, particularly in how to view the FBI once the dust clears.

National Security Threats and Red Scares

In his new book, The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump, McCabe begins by describing what he feels would be in his FBI personnel profile if he still had access to it. (Having been fired by Trump, he no longer does.) It is fairly predictable stuff — his schooling, background, friends and family — but twice in his exemplary work, he makes a point about sedition: “None [of those contacted] had ever seen or heard McCABE advocate for the overthrow of the United States, or support any group or organization opposed to the government of the United States.”

McCabe’s inclusion of this point inadvertently raises the specter of “McCarthyism” and “witch hunts” that have been the currency of Trump and his supporters (along with some elements on the left). The irony is that by invoking McCarthyism, they raise the specter of a period that does have ongoing relevance.

Contrary to received wisdom that the McCarthy era — which began well before McCarthy and lasted long past him — was an aberrant period in U.S. history, it was, among other things, a highly successful effort that facilitated the organizational suppression of the Communist Party. Leaving aside the larger critique of communism for the moment, this was unprecedented. Scores of Communist leaders were jailed under the provisions of the Smith Act, which made it a crime to advocate, or even teach the desirability, of the overthrow of the government. Sympathetic artists and intellectuals were driven from the public sphere. Multiple laws were passed mandating loyalty oaths denouncing the Communist Party, driving communists from unions, which required members to sign affidavits declaring they were not communists. And those who failed or refused to renounce communism needed to register as such or face legal consequences.

As a result, by 1953, a political party representing many tens of thousands was de facto (if not de jure) illegal. At the center of all this was the FBI, which had compiled files on more than 12,000 Communists the Bureau fully intended to detain in the event of a “national emergency.” That list was sanctioned by law and supported — tacitly or otherwise — by all presidents from Roosevelt to Nixon. If one wants to understand the depths of political repression possible in the U.S. and the necessity of the FBI in instituting such, one can find no better example than this Red Scare.

Further, while on one level, McCabe’s reference to overthrowing the government seems an archaic relic of the Cold War past, it goes to something central about the FBI’s stated mission “to protect and defend the United States against terrorist and foreign intelligence threats.” Currently, the greater share of the Bureau’s near 35,000 personnel are allocated to counterterrorism/counterintelligence and the separate category of intelligence — approximately 20,000 personnel to the 15,000 assigned to criminal enterprises and criminal justice services. In other words, the larger component of the FBI’s work remains focused on things other than “crime” — and it is there, historically, where the FBI has squared off against political challenges to the U.S. power structure.

It is also worth noting that none other than Donald Trump himself raised a certain specter in his 2019 State of the Union, declaring, “America will never be a socialist country” — an admission that there are quite a few people within U.S. society that see capitalism as the fundamental problem. Trumpian demagoguery aside, the polarization of U.S. society means the road ahead will be a contentious one. While the organizations that will emerge and the politics they cohere around is an open question, what is foreseeable is that the FBI will play the role of antagonist — beyond the one it is already playing against Black Lives Matter, various anti-fascists, and others.

Today, we find ourselves at an odd confluence of interests among a broad array of anti-Trump forces that include former leaders of the FBI. In this, we are being maneuvered — subtly and directly — toward re-establishing the political norms that preceded Trump. In that respect, in a post-Trump world (one that hopefully will come sooner than later), the likelihood of a stronger FBI looms large, and this will be good for the U.S. ruling structure. However, one only needs to look at the Bureau’s history to conclude that a stronger FBI will not be good for those straining against the abuses and inequality at the core of U.S. society.

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Saved Stories – Puerto Rico News


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mikenov on Twitter: The Trump Investigations: Germany probes far-right threats to politicians, c… trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/03/german…

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The Trump Investigations: Germany probes far-right threats to politicians, c… trumpinvestigations.blogspot.com/2019/03/german…


Posted by

mikenov
on Sunday, March 17th, 2019 5:08pm

mikenov on Twitter


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Transiciones

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Click here for the English version

Los períodos de transición suelen ser tiempos convulsos, llenos de incertidumbre y conflictos. Por ejemplo, en las ciencias, tal y como explicara Thomas Kuhn en su libro La Estructura de las Revoluciones Científicas, el período entre el cuestionamiento de un paradigma prevaleciente y la aceptación de un nuevo paradigma que lo reemplace, está lleno de incertidumbre y surgen amargos debates entre los que defienden el paradigma existente y los que promueven una manera nueva de entender la naturaleza.

En estos días en Puerto Rico estamos comenzando el proceso de transición de nuestro sistema eléctrico, de uno basado en grandes unidades generatrices centralizadas que queman combustibles fósiles a uno nuevo basado mayormente en la generación distribuida de electricidad utilizando fuentes renovables de energía.

No debe sorprendernos, entonces, que comience un debate público entre los que apoyan distintos derroteros para llevar a cabo esta transformación. Este choque de ideas y visiones es saludable, siempre y cuando los participantes obren de buena fe y con transparencia, como debe ser en una sociedad que se auto-denomina “democrática”.

Nosotros en el Centro para una Nueva Economía creemos que el nuevo sistema eléctrico de Puerto Rico debe maximizar la integración al sistema de capacidad de generación renovable y de tecnologías de almacenamiento, para proveer reservas, otros servicios auxiliares y carga adicional en las horas pico.

Cuando nos referimos a fuentes renovables de energía para generar electricidad, nos referimos no solamente a la energía solar fotovoltaica y la energía eólica, sino también a cualquier otra tecnología renovable, limpia y segura, que se ha comprobado es viable a escala comercial, por ejemplo, la generación con energía solar termal. En nuestra opinión se deben considerar todas las opciones factibles que cumplan con los parámetros anteriores, para confeccionar una cartera de generación lo más diversificada posible, dado el estado actual de la tecnología y el que se proyecta para el futuro cercano.

Desafortunadamente, la tecnología disponible en estos momentos no permite que toda la demanda de electricidad en Puerto Rico se pueda satisfacer con fuentes renovables de energía. La generación con fuentes renovables es intermitente, y aunque ese problema se puede manejar con tecnologías de almacenamiento de energía (baterías), no se puede eliminar en su totalidad.

Puerto Rico necesita satisfacer una carga base todo el día para mantener las escuelas, comercios, oficinas, hospitales, hoteles y fabricas funcionando, sin mencionar, la electricidad necesaria para nuestros hogares. No es lo mismo proveerle energía solar al colmadito de la esquina que a una economía y sociedad modernas de 3.1 millones de personas. Y simplemente no vemos factible—en el corto o mediano plazo—un escenario en el cual la capacidad de generación distribuida, usando placas fotovoltaicas, se pueda instalar masivamente utilizando los techos de 65% o más de las edificaciones existentes en Puerto Rico.

Por tanto, va a ser necesario añadir capacidad de generación nueva utilizando generación basada en fuentes no renovables. Sin embargo, se nos ha criticado por sugerir que la brecha entre la demanda y la oferta de electricidad se cierre con generación utilizando gas natural, el cual entendemos es una de las fuentes no renovables que menos contamina y de las más seguras. Eso a pesar de que hemos dejado claro que la construcción de infraestructura nueva de gas natural debe ser la mínima necesaria para mantener la estabilidad del sistema y permitir la maximización del uso de recursos renovables.

Esto significa:

  1. promover la integración al sistema de unidades de generación altamente eficientes y relativamente pequeñas; de manera consistente con el rediseño de la red de transmisión y distribución, y sin utilizar gasoductos;
  2. que dicha construcción debe limitarse a unidades cuya inversión pueda ser recuperada en 20 años o menos; y
  3. prohibir la construcción nueva de unidades de generación que utilicen combustibles fósiles después del 2030 para fomentar la transición a fuentes renovables y lograr el objetivo de generar 100% de nuestra electricidad con fuentes renovables en el 2050. Obviamente, estamos dispuestos a escuchar a organizaciones o personas que apoyen otras alternativas o planes.

Por otro lado, también nos han criticado por no favorecer la generación de electricidad con energía nuclear, a pesar de los avances en esa área. Es cierto que la tecnología de generación nuclear ha mejorado significativamente desde la década de los años 70, tan es así que de acuerdo con una reseña reciente en la revista The Atlantic algunos de los arquitectos del “Green New Deal” no la descartan como parte de su solución para eliminar las emisiones de gases invernadero.

En el caso de Puerto Rico no la vemos como una opción viable. Por más que haya mejorado la tecnología, el riesgo de un evento tipo “black swan”, de poca probabilidad pero con consecuencias catastróficas, no se puede eliminar por completo. El riesgo de un accidente nuclear en una isla del tamaño de Puerto Rico, por más remoto que sea, simplemente no es aceptable porque supone una amenaza existencial a nuestra sociedad. Además, pregúntese usted si se siente cómodo con la idea de proveerle Uranio-235 a la AEE, una de las agencias gubernamentales más corrupta y peor administrada en nuestra historia.

Al comienzo de esta transición tenemos que aceptar que no existen soluciones perfectas, todas tienen sus costos y beneficios y requieren que hagamos lo que en inglés llaman “tradeoffs”. Cuidado pues con los falsos profetas vendiendo soluciones que requieren la suspensión voluntaria de nuestra incredulidad. Especialmente con aquellos que acaban de desembarcar en Puerto Rico con poco conocimiento y menos entendimiento de nuestra economía, sociedad y sistema eléctrico.

 

Por: Sergio M. Marxuach

Director de Política Pública

Centro Para Una Nueva Economia

Esta columna se publicó originalmente en El Nuevo Día el 17 de marzo de 2019


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Transitions

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Haz click aquí para leer la versión en español

Periods of transition tend to be turbulent times, filled with uncertainty and conflict. In the sciences, for example, as Thomas Kuhn explains in his book “The Structure of Scientific Revolutions,” the period between the questioning of a prevailing paradigm and the acceptance of a new paradigm to replace it is filled with uncertainty, with bitter debates arising between those defending the existing paradigm and those putting forth a new way of understanding nature.

Today in Puerto Rico, we are beginning the transition from an electrical system based on large, centralized generating plants burning fossil fuels to a new system based mostly on distributed generation using renewable sources of energy.

It should not surprise us, then, that a public debate has begun between those who support differing paths toward achieving this transformation. This clash of ideas and visions is healthy, so long as the participants in the debate act in good faith and with transparency, as they should in a society that calls itself democratic.

At the Center for a New Economy, we believe that the new electrical system in Puerto Rico should maximize the integration of renewable energy and energy-storage technologies into the system in order to provide reserves, other auxiliary services, and additional load at peak hours.

When we refer to renewable sources of energy for generating electricity, we are referring not just to solar photovoltaic energy and wind energy, but to any other clean, safe, renewable technology that has been proved feasible on a commercial scale—for example, solar thermal energy. We believe that in order to create a portfolio of generation that is as diversified as possible given the current state of technology and the technology projected for the near future, all feasible options that meet the parameters of cleanness, safety, and renewability should be considered.

Unfortunately, the technology available at the moment does not allow the full demand for electricity in Puerto Rico to be satisfied with renewable sources of energy. Generation through renewable sources is intermittent, and although that problem can be mitigated with energy-storage technologies such as batteries, it cannot be completely eliminated.

Puerto Rico needs to satisfy a base load the entire day in order to keep schools, businesses, offices, hospitals, hotels, and factories running, not to mention the electricity needed for our homes. Providing solar energy to the corner grocery store is not the same as providing electricity for a modern economy and society of 3.1 million people. And we simply do not see as feasible—in either the short or medium term—a scenario in which distributed generation, using photovoltaic panels, can be mass-installed using the roofs of 65 percent or more of the existing buildings in Puerto Rico.

Therefore, we have no alternative but to add generation capacity from non-renewable sources. Yet we have been criticized for suggesting that the gap between the demand and the supply of electricity should be closed using natural gas, which we understand to be one of the least polluting and safest of the non-renewable sources—criticized, it must be said, despite the fact that we have made clear that the new natural gas infrastructure we build should be the minimum necessary for maintaining the stability of the system and allowing the maximum use of renewable resources.

This means:

  1. promoting the integration into the system of highly efficient and relatively small generation units, consistent with the redesign of the transmission and distribution network, and without using gas pipelines;
  2. that this construction should be limited to units the investment in which can be recovered in 20 years or less; and
  3. prohibiting new construction of generation units using fossil fuels after 2030, in order to encourage the transition to renewable sources and attain the ultimate objective of generating 100% of our electricity with renewable sources of energy by 2050. Obviously, we are willing to listen to organizations or individuals who support other alternatives or plans.

We have also been criticized for not supporting nuclear energy to generate electricity, despite advances in this area. It is true that the nuclear generation technology has improved significantly since the 1970s—improved so much that according to a recent article in The Atlantic some of the architects of the “Green New Deal” are not ruling it out as part of their solution for eliminating greenhouse gas emissions.

In the case of Puerto Rico, we do not see the nuclear option as feasible. However much the technology has improved, the risk of a “black swan” event—highly unlikely but with catastrophic consequences—cannot be completely eliminated. The risk of a nuclear accident on an island the size of Puerto Rico, however remote it might be, is simply unacceptable, because it represents an existential threat to our society. In addition, ask yourself whether you feel comfortable with the idea of providing Uranium-235 to PREPA, one of the most corrupt and worst-administered government agencies in our history.

At the beginning of this transition we have to accept that there are no perfect solutions. They all have their costs and benefits, and they require us to make trade-offs. Be wary, then, of false prophets hawking solutions that require what a poet once called “the willing suspension of disbelief.” And especially wary of those who have just arrived in Puerto Rico, with little knowledge and even less understanding of our economy, society, and electrical system.

 

By: Sergio M. Marxuach

Director of Public Policy

Centro for a New Economy

This column was originally published in El Nuevo Día on March 17, 2019


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Puerto Rico Topics and Daily News Review from Michael_Novakhov (11 sites): “Renewable Energy” – Google News: Trickle of States Around the World Producing All Power From Renewable Sources – The Wire

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Trickle of States Around the World Producing All Power From Renewable Sources  The Wire

Power generation from wind and solar also depends on where on the planet’s surface they are utilised and at which time of the year.

“Renewable Energy” – Google News

Puerto Rico Topics and Daily News Review from Michael_Novakhov (11 sites)


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Puerto Rico Topics and Daily News Review from Michael_Novakhov (11 sites): “Puerto Rico Bonds” – Google News: National Storage Affiliates Trust (NSA) Announces Quarterly Dividend of $0.30 – Fairfield Current

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National Storage Affiliates Trust (NSA) Announces Quarterly Dividend of $0.30  Fairfield Current

National Storage Affiliates Trust (NYSE:NSA) announced a quarterly dividend on Friday, February 22nd, Wall Street Journal reports. Shareholders of record on …

“Puerto Rico Bonds” – Google News

Puerto Rico Topics and Daily News Review from Michael_Novakhov (11 sites)


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“puerto rico business” – Google News: Historic Holmes Seed Co. ready for another planting season – The-review

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Historic Holmes Seed Co. ready for another planting season  The-review

It sells 1600 varieties of seeds to small commercial farmers in all 50 states and Puerto Rico.

“puerto rico business” – Google News


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“puerto rico” – Google Noticias: Nicaragua blanquea a Puerto Rico en segundo juego de la Serie Amistosa Internacional – Bateo Libre

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Nicaragua blanquea a Puerto Rico en segundo juego de la Serie Amistosa Internacional  Bateo Libre

Jorge Bucardo, Gustavo Martínez, Jesús Garrido y Ernesto Glasgon fueron los lanzadores encargados de blanquear 8 carreras por 0 a la selección de Puerto …

“puerto rico” – Google Noticias


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“puerto rico” – Google Noticias: 12:06 Congresista desea hacer menos opresiva ley para Puerto Rico – Prensa Latina

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12:06 Congresista desea hacer menos opresiva ley para Puerto Rico  Prensa Latina

17 de marzo de 2019, 00:06 San Juan, 16 mar (Prensa Latina) Ante la denuncias de los trabajadores y estudiantes de la precariedad en que se encuentra …

“puerto rico” – Google Noticias


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“puerto rico politics” – Google News: Opinion: Give all political status options to voters – Guam Pacific Daily News

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Opinion: Give all political status options to voters  Guam Pacific Daily News

If Guam’s political status change effort is going to be deemed credible before Congress, all option choices must be presented to participants.

“puerto rico politics” – Google News


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The Puerto Rico Times Topics from Michael_Novakhov (15 sites): Solar and other Renewable Energy in Puerto Rico from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites): “New Energy PR” – Google News: Solar Energy Charge Market Share, Trends and Forecast (2019- 2026) by Global Ind

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Solar Energy Charge Market Share, Trends and Forecast (2019- 2026) by Global Industry Top Players: Morningstar, Phocos, Steca, Beijing Epsolar, OutBack Power, Renogy, Sol – Press Release  Digital Journal

Morningstar, Phocos, Steca, Beijing Epsolar, Shuori New Energy, OutBack Power, Specialty Concepts, Renogy, Sollatek, Remote Power, Studer Innotec, Victron …

“New Energy PR” – Google News

Solar and other Renewable Energy in Puerto Rico from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites)

The Puerto Rico Times Topics from Michael_Novakhov (15 sites)


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