4:20 AM 4/30/2018 – A frenar el desbalance social – El Nuevo Dia.com | Politicization of public service in Puerto Rico | Politics Is Making Puerto Rico’s Problems Harder

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politicization of public service in puerto rico – Google Search
 

Story image for politicization of public service in puerto rico from Gizmodo

Politics Is Making Puerto Rico’s Problems Harder

GizmodoSep 28, 2017
Nearly a week after Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, President Trump finally waived the Jones Act for the island, allowing more emergency supplies reach the battered territory’s shores. The World … Trump only took action, after Governor Rosselló made a public plea for a temporary waiver.

Story image for politicization of public service in puerto rico from Scientific American (blog)

Why Is Puerto Rico Dismantling Its Institute of Statistics?

Scientific American (blog)Feb 1, 2018
PRIS has consistently reduced government costs, and improved the efficiency and quality of public services in Puerto Rico. For example, over the … If PRIS is eliminated, Puerto Rico’s statistical systems are likely to become highly politicized, like many other programs and agencies in the archipelago are.

Story image for politicization of public service in puerto rico from Washington Post

Federal disaster aid for Puerto Rico isn’t foreign aid — but Trump acts …

Washington PostOct 13, 2017
Trump’s recent tweets on Puerto Rico echo much of the criticism often leveled against foreign disaster and humanitarian assistance. … A country is considered to be dependent on aid when it can’t perform some of the core functions of government, like providing basic public services such as health care and …
To stop the social imbalance
 

In the late 1940s, the Puerto Rican public service became, along with education, one of the main vehicles for promoting upward social mobility in the country.

The public service, whose backbone was the system of merit, made it possible for people of humble social origins, through education and the approval of entrance examinations, to aspire to higher living standards through adequate performance in government positions. This happened, above all, through the so-called administrative career, in which a public official with the correct knowledge, attitudes and values for public service rose in the hierarchy of the government agency for which he worked, which resulted in better wages and benefits, and, therefore, in an ascending social mobility.

The system of merit allowed that when a young person entered the public service had expectations of a long career to serve the country, with a social position possibly superior to that of their parents, and then, could achieve a happy retirement, after 30 years of service These labor developments in the public sector turned out to be of great importance, since the private sector of our economy has never had the capacity to generate the necessary jobs in the country, which has resulted in a historical unemployment rate of over 10%.

Since the late sixties, public service has suffered a great deterioration, particularly through politicization. To advance political party agendas, laws and practices that tended to undermine the foundations of the same were approved in Puerto Rico. Among these, the appointment of exaggerated amounts of trustworthy employees, irregular and transitory, and the elimination of face-to-face exams for admission to the public service. Likewise, essential areas of merit, such as training and training, were abandoned and the system was decentralized in an unplanned manner. This deprived the country for some time of a governing body of the public career. Other elements also caused the deterioration of public service and the loss of citizens’ confidence in it.

Similarly, this reality is reflected in the book “The system of public function in Puerto Rico: origin, splendor, crisis and vision of the future”, recently published by the Pontifical Catholic University of Puerto Rico.

The current situation of the Puerto Rican public service, together with the inability of the private sector to generate jobs that enable citizens’ social mobility, increase the risk of creating a dual society in which only the rich and poor live, which is very away from our ideals as a people.

The formulators of public policies in the country should weigh this issue and equate in a very harmonious way the imperatives of facing the economic crisis facing the country, with the need to maintain an adequate balance in its social structure, to enable important segments of our society are not condemned to a life in poverty.

Fight with US over funding is threatening bankrupt Puerto Rico’s recovery effort
 

Pushback expected over smoking laws

The tough new measures include a total ban on smoking in outdoor public spaces, while e-cigarettes and electronic devices will be regulated

Paul Desmond – Cool Jazz, Quiet Melodic Tone, “Like a Dry Martini” – YouTube

Paul Desmond – Cool Jazz, Quiet Melodic Tone, “Like a Dry Martini”
Destiny El Choclo – YouTube

Destiny El Choclo
Jacob Gurevitsch – Lovers in Paris – YouTube

Jacob Gurevitsch – Lovers in Paris
Halie Loren – Perhaps, Perhaps, Perhaps – YouTube

Halie Loren – Perhaps, Perhaps, Perhaps
Flower Power – Caribbean Business
 

Editor’s note: The following article originally appeared in the April 26 issue of Caribbean Business.

After the recent announcement by the Medicinal Cannabis Regulatory Board on implementation of restrictions on the sale of the cannabis flower at dispensaries in Puerto Rico, there seems to be no respite from the controversy that has ensued over the use of the flower, given the vast polarization of opinions from both the governor’s office/ La Fortaleza and the Legislative Assembly.

According to a missive issued by the regulator, Act 42 “prohibits, as a method of administration, the ignition or combustion of medical cannabis,” and adds that the “vaporization of the cannabis flower to a patient diagnosed with a terminal illness or in cases where there is no other suitable or adequate alternative…” will be the means to administer medical cannabis.

However, experts say the flower is crucial for treatment, particularly in the case of people with low income, who cannot afford medical cannabis treatment by other means.

“I can tell you, based on my own experience, because coming from the perspective of patients, since I have a niece who was treated with medicinal cannabis, the importance of the flower for patients is essential because it is an economic alternative that she has to be able to make her own tea or be able to create her own cannabis butter to be able to prepare products,” explained José Giovanni Ojeda, vice president of Cruz Verde Inc. He is also a course instructor for CannaWorks Institute, which held the third edition of Puerto Rico MedCann.Biz, an event that brings together the medical cannabis industry, provides educational lectures and certifies patients for medical cannabis.

“The position of the Legislature is embodied in Act 42 of 2017, which clearly includes the flower. To change that public policy, established by the Legislature and endorsed by the executive [branch], there would have to be an amendment to the bill, and our information is that right now there’s no [political] atmosphere or sufficient votes to produce these amendments,” Ojeda added.

Statistics on Puerto Rico’s medical cannabis industry reflect significant growth and potential for the island’s long-awaited economic development. As expressed during the MedCann.Biz event, the industry continues to provide indications about medical cannabis’ potential, since it has registered some 25,000 patients as of April, compared with only 6,900 in April of last year.

There were nine cultivation licenses last year. That number has now risen to 15. In 2017, there were four manufacturers, while now there are 11. By the beginning of last year, there were only seven dispensaries. Today, Puerto Rico has 45, along with 322 registered doctors and two laboratories.

Puerto Rico Economic Development Dept. promotes investment in medical cannabis market

According to information provided, 54 percent of patients are age 52 or older and women over 52 comprise 48 percent of the female patients.

“The most striking thing about the numbers to me is that more than half of these patients surpass 55 years of age, and that’s a figure that breaks with the stigma that this is for young people. The baby boomers are signing up and that is a reality. Here in Puerto Rico, the commotion and curiosity that this issue has generated, especially in the medical class, has no comparison, even with the state of Colorado. When we look at that state and see the number of doctors involved there versus the number of physicians…involved here, the future is promising for us,” the expert told Caribbean Business.

“If you ask me, it seems…the flower will always prevail because, really, when you sit and listen to the testimonies of the patients, as countless legislators have done, and we are talking about the most conservative legislators to the most liberal, you totally change your mind,” he added.

The outlook for detractors of the flower for medical treatment could become even more complicated at a time when stateside surveys indicate voters, both Democrats and Republicans, support medical cannabis. According to a 2017 Yahoo/ Marist survey, 83 percent said doctors should be able to prescribe marijuana to patients.

–Read the rest of the story in CB’s epaper here.

GYPSY JAZZ – HOT CLUB DU NAX – Joseph Joseph – YouTube

GYPSY JAZZ – HOT CLUB DU NAX – Joseph Joseph
Francesca Gagnon – Querer – YouTube

Francesca Gagnon – Querer
Puerto Rico governor says to people in informal housing “It’s time to go”
 

By

Lizzie O’Leary and Danielle ChiriguayoApril 27, 2018 | 2:32 PM

Seven months after Hurricane Maria, Ricardo Rosselló, the governor of Puerto Rico, is in a unique position. He has a specific vision for where he wants Puerto Rico to go in the near future, but that’s in conflict with people on the island, the oversight board, and the region’s various creditors.

Rosselló has a lot of options when it comes to reshaping his community, but one of the most contentious issues on the island has to do with the aid complications around informal housing. When asked what he would say to residents who have been in informal housing for a long time, he responded, “It’s time to go.”

“One of the opportunities I think we have is to start to eradicating that informal housing component, [to] start pushing folks into safe, formal [home] ownership,” he said, later adding: “We have had a significant decrease in population, and that has led itself to a lot of houses to be available or owned by the bank. There’s an opportunity to leverage, in the short run. The second component is implementing what we want to have: the most robust construction codes in the nation. Make sure we are ready for another category 5 hurricane.”

Below are some other highlights from his interview with Marketplace Weekend host Lizzie O’Leary.

On Puerto Rico’s proposed school closures and education strike:

“We had already established this was going to happen a long time ago. Listen, nobody wants to go to a community and say ‘your school is closing down.’ But it is not a fiscal consideration, it is [an] education consideration. In the past decade, over 43 percent of our student population has decreased. We have scattered teachers all over the map. Most of our schools don’t have a full faculty. Achievement rates are very low – about 10 percent of our kids are proficient in math, science. Only about 50 percent are coming out proficient in 8th grade in Spanish. The objective with our program is that we can consolidate those resources – have economies of scale – and we want to give everybody the access to a full faculty, so they can get a better education.”

On Puerto Rico’s bond market and new budget:

“Our job right now is not to forecast what the bond holders will receive. Our object is to establish a fiscal plan that has fiscal measures, but also has economic growth and structural reforms. Puerto Rico is reducing their budget, more than any other state has done in the recent modern history of the United States. Within the next five years, we’re essentially reducing anywhere from almost a fourth of our budget, of our expenditures. That includes healthcare, education, and the size of government.”

On Puerto Rico’s pension recipients and pension cuts:

“There’s a philosophical divide – I think we’ve established that. For us, making sure that pension recipients get their share- it’s of the utmost importance. It is our view that they are the most vulnerable of individuals in Puerto Rico – they would go under the poverty line if gets executed. And it has a negative impact on the economy as well.”

On who’s in charge in Puerto Rico:

“This a novel setting. On the fiscal limitation front – the oversight board has the power. On Title III and lending, the judge has the final say. On public policy, I have, and the government of Puerto Rico have, the final say. A lot of those things intermingle with each other. My role though, is to make sure we execute and that our powers delegated to us by the people of Puerto Rico to design public policy and to implement it, are not relegated. You know what, if somebody had to tackle this challenging time for Puerto Rico, I’m glad it’s me, I’m glad it’s my team. It’s a tough time, but it’s also an opportunity to start anew, to execute proper reforms – like energy reform, regulation reforms, tax reform, education reform, and health care reforms. ”

Click the audio player below to hear the full interview. 

A Julia de Burgos – YouTube

A Julia de Burgos
julia de burgos – Google Search

Image result for julia de burgos
julia de burgos – Google Search

Image result for julia de burgos
julia de burgos – Google Search

Image result for julia de burgos
julia de burgos – Google Search

Image result for julia de burgos
julia de burgos – Google Search

Image result for julia de burgos
julia de burgos – Google Search

Image result for julia de burgos
julia de burgos – Google Search
 

Story image for julia de burgos from The New York Review of Books

‘The Fatal Conscience’: Julia de Burgos, Puerto Rico’s Greatest Poet

The New York Review of BooksApr 26, 2018
In 1927, Pérez Rosario told me, Julia de Burgos moved, unaccompanied, to live with a wealthier family in Río Piedras, though the details of this arrangement are not known. Unlike the elite literary ladies whom she later encountered, she would not have been expected to receive an education. “Women of …

Music Reviews: Jazz Albums from Takaaki, Jane Ira Bloom, Roy …

<a href=”http://seattlepi.com” rel=”nofollow”>seattlepi.com</a> (blog)10 hours ago
Remembranzas, a set of innovative but highly accessible mostly-Latin jazz, features the Puerto Rican native with his sextet performing four numbers McGrath wrote as a suite to honor Puerto Rican poet Julia de Burgos, along with four other tunes. Along with pianist Bill Cessna, bassist Joseph Kitt Lyles, and …
Julia de Burgos – Wikipedia

Julia de Burgos (February 17, 1914 – July 6, 1953) was a poet from Puerto Rico.[1][2][2][3][4][5] As an advocate of Puerto Rican independence, she served as Secretary General of the Daughters of Freedom, the women’s branch of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party.[6] She was also a civil rights activist for women and African/Afro-Caribbean writers.
‘The Fatal Conscience’: Julia de Burgos, Puerto Rico’s Greatest Poet | by Molly Crabapple | NYR Daily
 

After, when the sea will curl violently
They will say: “it is the fatal conscience of that girl,
She had many sins because she always lived in verse
And what you do on earth, on earth you pay for.”

—From “After,” by Julia de Burgos

In 1928, when Julia de Burgos was fourteen, Hurricane San Felipe devastated Puerto Rico. The Category Five storm left not a single building unscathed, least of all the wood casita in a mountain barrio in Carolina where De Burgos was born. Three hundred people died in what would be, for the next ninety years, the most violent storm in the island’s history. Julia de Burgos did not record her experience.


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