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governor andrew cuomo – Google Search

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The Amazon’s solar-powered river bus – BBC News
governor andrew cuomo – Google Search
governor andrew cuomo – Google Search
Federal grants will take long to help Puerto Rico’s recovery – Caribbean Business
Alacran — Reflejo de Luna – YouTube
Pink Martini (with singer Storm Large) – Amado Mio – YouTube
Connie Evingson – I Can’t Believe That You’re in Love with Me – YouTube
Tensions rise as Puerto Rico residents lack basic services, electricity
Marijuana News – The Price For Weed In These Latin America Cities Will Shock You
travis reinking – Google Search
Police searched Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking’s apartment
Waffle House Shooting Suspect Travis Reinking Told Tech in Audio to ‘Jump off a Bridge or Something’
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AP Top Stories April 25 A – YouTube
US Breaks Locks of Russian Diplomatic Site – YouTube
El Departamento de Justicia inicia investigación contra Facebook
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Can Puerto Rico Recover From Maria Before the Next Storm Hits?
@cbenespanol @CaribBusiness The commonwealth fiscal plan was certified. Sole dissenter was Board Member Ana Matosantos
Hedge fund manager bets that Puerto Rico will drag insurer under – Insurance Business

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The Amazon’s solar-powered river bus – BBC News

Mr Borman has come to work with the Achuar on a new prototype of the boat because its current engine, originally designed in Germany, is struggling with the Amazon’s hot sandy stick-strewn waters.

The ultimate dream for Mr Utne and Mr Saant is a whole network of sustainable solar canoes navigating these ancient Amazonian highways.

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governor andrew cuomo – Google Search

Story image for governor andrew cuomo from Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

Ban single-use plastic bags in New York, GovAndrew Cuomo says

Rochester Democrat and Chronicle15 hours ago
ALBANY – GovAndrew Cuomo on Monday called for a ban on plastic carryout bags at stores across New York, calling them an environmental scourge that needs to be addressed. Cuomo, a Democrat, introduced a bill that prevent groceries, convenience stores and all other points of sale from using …
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Luz Casal – Piensa en mi – YouTube

Luz Casal – Piensa en mi
Federal grants will take long to help Puerto Rico’s recovery – Caribbean Business

Federal grants will take long to help Puerto Rico’s recovery

By Eva Lloréns Vélez on April 23, 2018

Editor’s note: This story first appeared Thursday, in the April 19-25, 2018, issue of Caribbean Business.

It will take “many months” for Puerto Rico’s $1.5 billion disaster recovery (DR) grant awarded in February and $18.5 billion in grants announced April 10 to repair hurricane-damaged homes, businesses and the power grid to enter the local economy.

The $1.5 billion grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) in February is expected to filter into the local economy during the last quarter of 2018. Last week, the local Housing Department turned over to HUD a management plan spelling out how the agency would control the funds to prevent abuse, duplication and fraud, said Dennis González, deputy secretary of the Puerto Rico Housing Department. On May 9, the local agency must turn in an action plan providing the specifics on how it will use these funds. The plan must receive public input before HUD certifies it in June. After that, the process begins to disburse the money into the local economy.

Regarding the $18.5 billion in grants, which were assigned through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program, HUD spokesman Brian Sullivan told Caribbean Business that two Federal Register notices are to be issued to provide guidelines on how the money should be spent. One notice is to spell out how $10.1 billion from these funds must be used to address remaining unmet needs created from 2017’s major disasters, including hurricanes Irma and Maria. The second notice will address the use of the remaining $8.29 billion to support mitigation activities among CDBG-DR grantees. Both documents spell out deadlines for local planning officials to submit DR plans of action and other documentation to disburse the funds.

“The notices sort of spell out the number of activities that will be covered. So, part of the money is used to recover from previous storms and the other part is to help make places stronger for future events,” he said.

Money for unmet needs, however, generally support DR activities such as home rebuilding, business assistance, economic revitalization and infrastructure repair.

Funds for mitigation activities may include home buyouts, raising homes, moving communities and rebuilding a resilient electric grid, he said.

Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico Sept. 20 and caused more than $100 billion in damages. It destroyed about 70,000 homes and damaged another 300,000.

“These funds are crucial present our vision for the new, more resilient Puerto Rico that we want to construct for our future generations,” said Gov. Ricard Rosselló in a statement following HUD’s April 10 announcement. The $18.5 billion was included in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, which was signed into law Feb. 9. Of that money, $2 billion will be set aside for making the island’s electric grid more resilient.

On the other hand, the $1.5 billion grant was part of a bill signed into law Sept. 8 by President Trump that provided a total of $7.4 billion in CDBG-DR funds.

González acknowledged that by the time the money goes into the economy, Puerto Rico will be in the middle of the 2018 hurricane season, which runs June 1 to Nov. 30, but assured the island is ready for a major storm. He said the funds are the last resort after other money, such as from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and private insurance, is used up.

HUD’s Sullivan said that after a major storm like Maria, “people need the money last week, and I get it, but we have to have a planning process” because the funds are for a long-term recovery process. “This money is the last bit of federal money. It is not the second nor the third. It is the last money for unmet needs. It is for the months and years to come,” Sullivan said.

How will Puerto Rico spend the $1.5 billion, according to its plan? According to HUD, about $1.2 billion of the fund must be spent on recovery, restoration of infrastructure and housing, and economic revitalization in the areas most impacted and distressed, including Adjuntas, Aguada, Aguadilla, Aguas Buenas, Aibonito, Añasco, Arecibo, Arroyo, Barceloneta, Barranquitas, Bayamón, Caguas, Camuy, Canóvanas, Carolina, Cataño, Cayey, Ciales, Cidra, Coamo, Comerío, Corozal, Dorado, Fajardo, Guayama, Guaynabo, Gurabo, Hatillo, Humacao, Isabela, Juana Díaz, Juncos, Lares, Las Piedras, Loíza, Manatí, Maunabo, Mayagüez, Moca, Morovis, Naguabo, Naranjito, Orocovis, Patillas, Ponce, Río Grande, Salinas, San Juan, San Lorenzo, San Sebastián, Santa Isabel, Toa Alta, Toa Baja, Trujillo Alto, Utuado, Vega Alta, Vega Baja, Villalba, Yabucoa, and Yauco.

González said the action plan for the $1.5 billion was prepared using input from mayors and nonprofit groups, as well as from numerous public hearings. He said once the action plan is made public in May, the agency is required to receive more public input before HUD approves the final plan in June.

By August, the first bids to hire companies for contracts will be sent out.

Concerns among builders

Stephen Spears, president of the Associated General Contractors Puerto Rico Chapter, says the funds were encouraging news, and the fact the local Housing Department was working with HUD to collect information and disburse funds will ensure local contractors will have a fair chance to obtain grants to perform work.

–Read the rest of this article in Caribbean Business’ epaper here.

Alacran — Reflejo de Luna – YouTube

Alacran — Reflejo de Luna
Pink Martini (with singer Storm Large) – Amado Mio – YouTube

Pink Martini (with singer Storm Large) – Amado Mio
Connie Evingson – I Can’t Believe That You’re in Love with Me – YouTube

Connie Evingson – I Can’t Believe That You’re in Love with Me
Tensions rise as Puerto Rico residents lack basic services, electricity

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Puerto Rico’s Senate has ordered government agencies to explain why tens of thousands of people in rural areas remain without power or appropriate shelter as anger grows about the lack of basic services more than seven months after hurricanes Irma and Maria.

The agencies have been given five days to present a plan on how and when they will address the needs of rural towns, an order that came as police in a small mountain town blocked power crews from leaving Tuesday. Joining the protest was the mayor and dozens of people who noted that nearly 40 percent of Las Piedras’ inhabitants were still without electricity service as crews prepared to leave for another town on company orders.

“This is unfair,” 62-year-old town resident Rafael Jimenez said by phone. “I don’t have a problem with other towns getting power because it’s a national necessity, but we need it, too.”

When an island-wide blackout hit earlier this month, CBS News correspondent David Begnaud, who has reported extensively on the island’s devastation, reported that the power authority would prioritize restoring electricity to hospitals, the airport and gas stations. Residences would receive the lowest priority.

The standoff caught the attention of top Puerto Rico government officials and ended several hours later after the power company promised it would keep crews in Las Piedras until service is fully restored. Justo Gonzalez, the company’ executive sub director, said in a statement that he is committed to restoring power to everyone but that blocking crews would only delay those efforts.

More than 33,000 power customers across Puerto Rico remain in the dark, including Jimenez, who said he has spent hundreds of dollars to run a small generator to help keep his relatives alive.

Jimenez is caring for his 97-year-old grandmother, who is bedridden and relies on an oxygen tank, as well as for his elderly parents. His mother relies on refrigerated insulin.

The family has been without power since Hurricane Irma, which brushed past Puerto Rico’s northeastern coast as a Category 5 storm Sept. 6. Maria then hit the island Sept. 20 as a Category 4 storm, killing dozens of people and causing more than an estimated $100 billion in damage.

“People are not doing well,” Las Piedras Mayor Miguel Lopez told The Associated Press, noting that there are many elderly people in his town. “They are suffering.”

The mayors of rural towns across Puerto Rico recently complained that they remain largely forgotten, prompting the island’s Senate president on Monday to order agencies such as the power company as well as Puerto Rico’s department of transportation and housing authority to submit a restoration plan and a timetable to meet the mayors’ needs.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which is overseeing federal power restoration efforts on the island, has said they expect to restore power to everyone by late May. Many remain wary of that timetable, including federal legislators who have requested that the agency’s mission be extended as they note that the Atlantic hurricane seasons starts June 1.

© 2018 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Marijuana News – The Price For Weed In These Latin America Cities Will Shock You

 News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Thurs. Mar. 29, 2018: When it comes to weed, Latin American cities serve up some of the cheapest globally. According to a recent study by Seedo, you can get a gram of ganja in five Latin America nations for less than US$5. Here’s where you can find the cheapest weed globally.

1: Ecuador

In Quito, Ecuador, where weed is partially legal, you can buy a gram for a mere US $1.34, the lowest anywhere in the world based on the 120 countries surveyed, which excluded the Caribbean region, including Jamaica.

2: Colombia

In Bogota, Colombia, a gram of marijuana will set you back just US $2.20, that’s the second cheapest out of the 120 countries surveyed. Weed here is partially legal as well.

STOCK UP ON YOUR WEED SNACKS NOW – LEGALLY

3: Paraguay

In Asuncion, Paraguay, a gram of partially legal weed will cost US $2.22, the third cheapest out of the 120 nations surveyed.

4: Panama

In Panama City, where ganja is still illegal, you can still get a gram for less than four dollars at US $3.85 per gram, the fourth cheapest in the survey.

5: Uruguay

In Montevideo, Uruguay, where marijuana is legal, you will have to shell out a bit more than the other Latin American cities featured here but at US $ 4.15, it is still far cheaper than weed in South Korea or Japan at under $5 and the fifth cheapest globally – at least in the Seedo list of cities and nations surveyed.

travis reinking – Google Search

Story image for travis reinking from The Tennessean

Found in Travis Reinking’s apartment: More than 1000 rounds of …

The Tennessean13 hours ago
Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking’s one-bedroom apartment contained more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition, two laptops and a GoPro camera, according to court documents. Police have also determined how much ammunition was used when they said Reinking, 29, opened fire in the …
Bond Revoked For Accused Waffle House Shooter
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Waffle House shooting suspect had displayed odd behavior but did …
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Police searched Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking’s apartment

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Travis Reinking was booked into Davidson County jail on four counts of criminal homicide related to a shooting at a Waffle House in Antioch.

Travis Reinking was booked into Davidson County jail on four counts of criminal homicide related to a shooting at a Waffle House in Antioch.(Photo: MNPD)

Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking’s one-bedroom apartment contained more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition, two laptops and a GoPro camera, according to court documents.

Police have also determined how much ammunition was used when they said Reinking, 29, opened fire in the Sunday morning shooting.

The investigation into the shooting, which killed four people and injured several others, is progressing along multiple tracks, with some officers pulling data from Reinking’s electronic devices and others combing through evidence from the crime scene.

More on the Waffle House shooting

►  Waffle House shooting suspect left trail of bizarre behaviors in Colorado

► Suspect Travis Reinking previously fired from job because he was ‘paranoid’

► Police search suspect’s electronics amid investigation into Waffle House shooting

Travis Reinking, the suspect in a deadly shooting at

Travis Reinking, the suspect in a deadly shooting at an Antioch Waffle House, is escorted into Hill Detention Center for booking in Nashville, Tenn., Monday, April 23, 2018.  Lacy Atkins / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel carry a black backpack from the woods after the nearby arrest Monday, April 23, 2018, of Antioch Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking in Nashville, Tenn.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Godmother of DeEbony Groves, who refused to give her name, cries as she listens to Chief of Police Steve Anderson talk to the media at a press conference after Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking was captured Monday, April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Lydia French said she called 911 on MondayÊafter she saw a man who looked like Reinking emerge from the woods offÊMurfreesboro Pike looking “shocked” and “disoriented.” That person turned out to be Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking. Monday April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn   Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking was captured near Old Hickory Boulevard and Hobson Pike on Monday, April 23, 2018.  Metro Nashville Police Department Photo

Travis Reinking, the suspect in a deadly shooting at an Antioch Waffle House, is escorted into Hill Detention Center for booking in Nashville, Tenn., Monday, April 23, 2018.  Lacy Atkins / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel escort Travis Reinking, the Antioch Waffle House shooting suspect, from Nashville General Hospital Monday, April 23, 3018.  Alan Poizner / For The Tennessean

A window is boarded up at the Antioch Waffle House which remains closed Monday, April 23, 2018 after four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Metro Nashville Police chief Steve Anderson speaks to the media at a press conference after Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking was captured Monday, April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

ATF personnel search a wooded area Monday, April 23, 2018 near the Church of Christ Burnette Chapel, scene of the 2017 Antioch church shooting, for the gunman who shot and killed four people early Sunday morning in a nearby Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking was found in a construction site area near his apartment complex Monday, April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel leave the woods near where Antioch Waffle House suspect Travis Reinking was arrested Monday, April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Police search for Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking in the area of Smith Springs Pky and Mt. View Rd. Monday, April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking Monday April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn   Larry McCormack / The Tennessea

Travis Reinking, the suspect in a deadly shooting at an Antioch Waffle House, is escorted into Hill Detention Center for booking in Nashville, Tenn., Monday, April 23, 2018.  Lacy Atkins / The Tennessean

Travis Reinking, the suspect in a deadly shooting at an Antioch Waffle House, is escorted into Hill Detention Center for booking in Nashville, Tenn., Monday, April 23, 2018.  Lacy Atkins / The Tennessean

Travis Reinking, the suspect in a deadly shooting at an Antioch Waffle House, is escorted into Hill Detention Center for booking in Nashville, Tenn., Monday, April 23, 2018.  Lacy Atkins / The Tennessean

Travis Reinking, the suspect in a deadly shooting at an Antioch Waffle House, is escorted into Hill Detention Center for booking in Nashville, Tenn., Monday, April 23, 2018.  Lacy Atkins / The Tennessean

Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking Monday April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn   Larry McCormack / The Tennessea

Law enforcement personnel escort accused Antioch Waffle House gunman Travis Reinking into booking Monday, April 23, 3018, at Hill Detention Center in Nashville, Tenn.  Lacy Atkins / The Tennessean

Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking Monday April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn   Larry McCormack / The Tennessea

Spectators come out to watch as Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking was found in an area near his apartment complex. Monday, April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking was found in a construction site area near his apartment complex Monday, April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Metro Nashville Police Lt. Carlos Lara talks to the media at a press conference after Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking was captured Monday, April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Ginevieve Alvarez, 11, talks on the phone to her friends after seeing Antioch Waffle House suspect Travis Reinking run down the street in her neighborhood just before his arrest Monday, April 23, 3018 in Nashville, Tenn.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel carry out a black backpack and brown paper bag from the woods after the nearby arrest Monday, April 23, 2018, of Antioch Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking in Nashville, Tenn.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel go into the woods after the arrest nearby of Antioch Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking Monday, April 23, 3018 in Nashville, Tenn.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Neighbors watch police activity in Old Hickory Commons neighborhood near where Antioch Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking was arrested on Monday, April 23, 3018, in Nashville, Tenn. Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel gather on a construction road behind Discovery at Mountain View apartments where Waffle House shooting suspect was believed to have lived. He was captured nearby by police Monday afternoon, April 23, 3018.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel search Monday, April 23, 2018, in the area of Smith Springs Recreation Area for the suspect in the Antioch Waffle House shooting where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect was captured Monday afternoon.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel search Monday, April 23, 2018, in the area of Smith Springs Recreation Area for the suspect in the Antioch Waffle House shooting where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect was captured Monday afternoon.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Residents stand at the corner of Paddington and Smith Springs Parkway Law as helicopters and police dogs search the area Monday, April 23, 2018, for the suspect in the Antioch Waffle House shooting in which four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect was captured Monday afternoon.   Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Police search for Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking in the area of Smith Springs Pky and Mt. View Rd. Monday April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn   Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Police direct traffic in Old Hickory Commons neighborhood near where a witness said she saw Antioch Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking run down her street before his arrest on Monday, April 23, 3018, in Nashville, Tenn.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel search Monday, April 23, 2018, in the area of Smith Springs Recreation Area for the suspect in the Antioch Waffle House shooting where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Plywood has been installed over bullet holes Monday, April 23, 3018, at the Antioch Waffle House where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Travis Reinking is taken into custody on Monday, April 23, 2018 after a 34-hour manhunt. Reinking is accused of fatally shooting four people at a Waffle House on Sunday.  MNPD

Travis Reinking, picture taken in July 2017 after his arrest at the White House in Washington D.C. Tennessee Bureau of Investigation

Chief of Police Steve Anderson listens as Lt. Carlo Lara talks to the media at a press conference after Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking was captured. Monday April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Travis Reinking, the suspect in a shooting at Waffle House that killed 4 people, is believed to be a suspect in a vehicle theft at BMW of Nashville on Tuesday, April 17, 2018.  Brentwood Police

Law enforcement personnel search Monday, April 23, 2018, in the area of Smith Springs Recreation Area for the suspect in the Antioch Waffle House shooting where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel search Monday, April 23, 2018, in the area of Smith Springs Recreation Area for the suspect in the Antioch Waffle House shooting where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Larry McCormack / The Tennessean

Law enforcement return from searching a wooded area Monday, April 23, 2018 near the Church of Christ Burnette Chapel, scene of the 2017 Antioch church shooting. Police have been searching for a second day for the gunman who shot and killed four people early Sunday morning in a nearby Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn.   Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking was found in an area near his apartment complex. Monday April 23, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn   Larry McCormack / The Tennessea

Metro Nashville Police spokesman Don Aaron updates media Monday, April 23, 2018, on the search for the suspect in the Antioch Waffle House shooting where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

ATF personnel pause outside a house after searching a wooded area Monday, April 23, 2018 near the Church of Christ Burnette Chapel, scene of the 2017 Antioch church shooting. Law enforcement has been searching for a second day for the gunman who shot and killed four people early Sunday morning in a nearby Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn.   Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

ATF personnel return from searching a wooded area Monday, April 23, 2018 near the Church of Christ Burnette Chapel, scene of the 2017 Antioch church shooting. Law enforcement has been searching for a second day for the gunman who shot and killed four people early Sunday morning in a nearby Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn.   Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

ATF personnel return from searching a wooded area Monday, April 23, 2018 near the Church of Christ Burnette Chapel, scene of the 2017 Antioch church shooting. Law enforcement has been searching for a second day for the gunman who shot and killed four people early Sunday morning in a nearby Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

ATF personnel search a wooded area Monday, April 23, 2018 near the Church of Christ Burnette Chapel, scene of the 2017 Antioch church shooting, for the gunman who shot and killed four people early Sunday morning in a nearby Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Travis Reinking, the suspect in a shooting at Waffle House that killed 4 people, is believed to be a suspect in a vehicle theft at BMW of Nashville on Tuesday, April 17, 2018.  Brentwood Police

ATF personnel search a wooded area Monday, April 23, 2018 near the Church of Christ Burnette Chapel, scene of the 2017 Antioch church shooting, for the gunman who shot and killed four people early Sunday morning in a nearby Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

ATF personnel move to a new staging area Monday, April 23, 2018, in the parking lot at Church of Christ Burnette Chapel, scene of the 2017 Antioch church shooting. Law enforcement is searching for a second day for the gunman who shot and killed four people early Sunday morning in a nearby Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

ATF personnel move to a new staging area Monday, April 23, 2018, in the parking lot at Church of Christ Burnette Chapel, scene of the 2017 Antioch church shooting. Law enforcement is searching for a second day for the gunman who shot and killed four people early Sunday morning in a nearby Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

ATF personnel gather at a new staging area Monday, April 23, 2018, in the parking lot at Church of Christ Burnette Chapel, scene of the 2017 Antioch church shooting. Law enforcement is searching for a second day for the gunman who shot and killed four people early Sunday morning in a nearby Waffle House in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Part of an ATF special response team of 20 officers and two dogs from Dallas mobilizes Monday, April 23, 2018, at the police command post across from the Antioch Waffle House where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

An ATF special response team of 20 officers and two dogs from Dallas gather Monday, April 23, 2018, at the police command post across from the Antioch Waffle House where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel gather Monday, April 23, 2018, at the police command post across from the Antioch Waffle House where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel gather Monday, April 23, 2018, at the police command post across from the Antioch Waffle House where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

Law enforcement personnel gather Monday, April 23, 2018, at the police command post across from the Antioch Waffle House where four people were shot and killed by a gunman early Sunday morning in Nashville, Tenn. The suspect is still at large.  Shelley Mays / The Tennessean

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Waffle House shooting suspect Travis Reinking captured

In documents filed with a search warrant in criminal court, police said they seized a black GoPro camera, which can be used to record video. On Wednesday, police spokesman Don Aaron confirmed that video footage “is among the material being collected from the electronic devices.”

Aaron would not describe the content of the video footage. He said the analysis of the video and other digital information was “part of the police department’s efforts to learn as much as we can about Reinking.”

At the same time, the analysis of crime scene evidence continues. Police Chief Steve Anderson told community members that “it appears that 30 rounds were expended” during the shooting, Aaron said.

Police found more ammunition in the pockets of the green bomber jacket they said Reinking wore during the shooting.

Detective Derry Baltimore outlined what police seized from Reinking’s apartment in paperwork filed in court Tuesday.

  • Remington .30-06 rifle with a magazine
  • 824 long rifle cartridges
  • 87 rifle cartridges
  • 43 .22 cartridges
  • 30 .223 cartridges
  • 29 .45 automatic cartridges
  • Two gun scopes
  • GoPro camera
  • Four cell phones, including a white iPhone
  • Two laptops
  • Two PC towers
  • Two hard drives
  • Two jump drives
  • Three routers
  • Modem

Reinking was taken into custody Monday afternoon after a 34-hour manhunt that included hundreds of law enforcement officers.

He was charged with criminal homicide in the deaths of four people. On Tuesday afternoon, police added four charges of attempted criminal homicide.

Reach Adam Tamburin at 615-726-5986 and <a href=”mailto:atamburin@tennessean.com”>atamburin@tennessean.com</a>. Follow him on Twitter @tamburintweets.

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Waffle House Shooting Suspect Travis Reinking Told Tech in Audio to ‘Jump off a Bridge or Something’

The man who allegedly killed four people at a Waffle House in Nashville, Tennessee, early Sunday morning told the owner of a laptop repair shop to “jump off a bridge” after he asked employees to delete everything on his hard drive a couple weeks before the shooting.

Travis Reinking, 29, took his laptop to Dang It Repair in March. Robert Hartline, the owner of the repair shop, said there was nothing weird about the transaction.

Reinking then made a phone call on April 11, two weeks before the shooting, and asked an employee if the shop could erase the hard drive after saying he had an issue with it.

“Sorry, are you wanting to make a backup disk? Or—” a technician asked, according to a recording of the phone call obtained by WSMV and published Tuesday.

Travis Reinking, 29, is placed in the back of a police car after being arrested in Nashville, Tennessee, on April 23. Reinking made a phone call to an electronics repair shop two weeks before the shooting and asked an employee if they could erase his hard drive. Getty Images

Reinking cut him off and implied that the technician knew what he was talking about.

“No, uh, yeah, that’s what I’m saying. If I made a backup disk and kept that for later and had somebody analyze it, they are not going to find anything on it that you guys put there, are they?” Reinking asked the technician. “Why are you guys doing this, man? I don’t get it. Why…what are you getting out of this?”

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When the technician said they didn’t understand the question and suggested Reinking bring in his laptop for them to take a look, he called the technician a liar. Before hanging up, Reinking said the tech should “jump off a bridge or something.”

“Yeah, well, go kill yourself then. Jump off a bridge or something,” Reinking said.

Hartline said Reinking sounded “paranoid” during the phone call. Hartline made the decision to send the audio to the police.

“It was my feeling the faster we put this info out there for everyone, the faster families can deal with their pain of loss,” Hartline told WSMV.

The shooting on Sunday launched a manhunt for the 29-year-old suspect. Reinking was found in the woods 35 hours later and taken into custody. He has been charged with four counts of criminal homicide in connection with the shooting.

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Antioch Waffle House to donate sales towards victim’s families

<a href=”http://whnt.com” rel=”nofollow”>whnt.com</a>20 hours ago
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — According to Waffle House’s Twitter account, 100% of next month’s sales from the Antioch restaurant will be given to the victim’s families- both living and deceased. This act of kindness comes after a gunman walked into the business and opened fire – killing four and injuring others.
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Antioch Waffle House reopens, to donate sales to shooting victims …

<a href=”http://WBIR.com” rel=”nofollow”>WBIR.com</a>20 hours ago
Before returning to work employees pay their respects at a memorial to the four people that were killed in Sunday’s shooting at a Waffle House in Antioch, Tenn. (Photo: Lacy Atkins / The Tennessean). Waffle House officials said they plan on creating a permanent memorial in the near future at the Antioch …
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Waffle House reopens with profits going to victims’ families over the …

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The Antioch Waffle House, site of a mass shooting this week that left four people dead and several others injured, reopened Wednesday morning …. the employees who reported to work included those who work at that location as well as other team members who traveled to Nashville from Atlanta to help.
Antioch Waffle House reopens after mass shooting
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Antioch Waffle House Re-Opens: Profits Earmarked For Victims
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AP Top Stories April 25 A – YouTube

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US Breaks Locks of Russian Diplomatic Site – YouTube

US Breaks Locks of Russian Diplomatic Site
El Departamento de Justicia inicia investigación contra Facebook

La secretaria de Justicia, Wanda Vázquez Garced, informó hoy que la Oficina de Asuntos Monopolísticos del Departamento de Justicia comenzó una investigación civil relacionada a las prácticas de negocios de la red social Facebook, sobre la recolección de data y el uso de la misma por terceros no autorizados.

“El requerimiento de información y producción de documentos busca obtener la data necesaria para llevar a cabo un análisis de las prácticas de seguridad y privacidad de los usuarios con relación a la práctica de Facebook en cuanto a compartir los datos a terceros”, reza un comunicado de prensa de la agencia.

La secretaria Auxiliar de la Oficina de Asuntos Monopolísticos, Denise Maldonado Rosa, dijo que Puerto Rico se une a otros estados que investigan las prácticas de privacidad de la red social.

“Los puertorriqueños están al tanto de las revelaciones recientes de que los datos de 87 billones de los usuarios de la plataforma social Facebook que terceros tuvieron acceso a su información sin el conocimiento ni consentimiento de sus usuarios. Facebook anunció que está en el proceso de notificar a sus usuarios quienes pudiesen haber sido impactados por el uso no autorizado de datos compartidos”, añade el comunicado.

Maldonado Rosa añadió que “la privacidad y seguridad de datos personales son vitalmente importantes en la era digital. Los usuarios merecen conocer los datos que recolecta Facebook y cómo la misma es utilizada y compartida”.

El 11 de abril el fundador de Facebook, Marck Mark Zuckerberg, aseguró en una vista en el Congreso de Estados Unidos que los datos personales de millones de usuarios, incluidos los suyos,  fueron vendidos sin su consentimiento a la empresa de consultoría política Cambridge Analytica. 

El escándalo de los datos de Facebook estalló en marzo, cuando varios medios revelaron que la empresa había usado datos de Facebook para elaborar perfiles psicológicos de votantes que supuestamente vendieron, entre otros, a la campaña del ahora presidente Donald Trump durante las elecciones de 2016.

Según Zuckerberg, Facebook comenzó a notificar a los usuarios que habían visto comprometidos sus datos con Cambridge Analytica.

Durante la audiencia en el Congreso, el líder de la famosa red social también aceptó que que Facebook recopila información de personas que no utilizan sus servicios “por motivos de seguridad”.

No obstante, Clarence Mitchell, portavoz de Cambridge Analytica, aseguró que la empresa a la que representa ha sido víctima de malentendidos y de información errónea. 

Mitchell también insistió en que la compañíano violó ninguna ley, pero reconoció que había encomendado una investigación independiente que se está desarrollando.

“La empresa ha sido retratada en algunos lugares como el villano de una cinta de Bond”, aseveró.

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El mar como espejo de tu oficio. Video 360
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Can Puerto Rico Recover From Maria Before the Next Storm Hits?

Puerto Rico still doesn’t know how many people died from Hurricane Maria. The official death toll of people drowned in floods, killed by landslides, caught in collapsed houses, or who perished from environmental or health problems in the immediate aftermath of the storm seven months ago sits at 64. By just about all accounts, that is an undercount by at least an order of magnitude. New York Timesreview of daily mortality rates found just over 1,000 more people died during and after the storm than expected. Additional analyses suggests similar figures. Governor Ricardo Rosselló is expected to release a full review of the island’s death toll next month.

One difficulty in making these grisly calculations is that Puerto Ricans are still dying from Hurricane Maria. The storm erased the island’s power grid and crushed critical health-care infrastructure, and then the tepid disaster recovery response allowed infectious disease and mental-health issues to fester for months. There are still plenty of significant health-care challenges on the island that stem from Maria. And even as recovery stretches on, the bodies are counted, and the public-health system scrambles to avoid capsizing, the next hurricane season looms just a couple months away.

Puerto Rico was in the grip of a public-health crisis well before Maria barreled ashore in September. Zika had become endemic in the humid, tropical climate over a year before, and like many of the illnesses emerging on the island, it took advantage of a health-care system that lay in shambles. The major—and ongoing—financial and energy crunch that forced Congress to pass a bailout bill in early 2016 also hamstrung many health-care facilities. During his visit to Puerto Rico in May of that year, then-Treasury Secretary Jack Lew toured a major hospital with leaking ceilings, faltering electricity, supply delays in life-saving medications, and a backlog of dialysis patients. It was emblematic of a health-care system hobbled by crumbling infrastructure and evaporating municipal funds.

But even when the lights are on and hospitals run smoothly, demographic, geographic, and political features all contribute to a slate of inherent health challenges. Puerto Rico has experienced mass out-migration to the mainland over the past few decades, leaving behind on the island a population that is disproportionately elderly and sick. Puerto Rico has a health profile more akin to developing countries and poor communities of color than to the United States as a whole. Infant mortality has always been higher on the island than on the mainland. The infectious-disease burden is also higher than on the mainland, with forests and damp places on the island serving as reservoirs for old tropical-fever diseases that have all but been forgotten on the north side of the Caribbean.

In all, what Hurricane Maria encountered was a system perched only a small disaster away from complete chaos. But the hurricane was a very large disaster. The lackluster and slow federal response, the lack of coordination between different levels of government, the Puerto Rican Power Authority’s complete failure, and the ongoing Congress-imposed austerity plan all contributed to a months-long power outage and a drawn-out, patchwork recovery—one punctuated by a total blackout last week. Even in the best of circumstances, Maria would have created a public-health catastrophe, but what ensued was worse than it needed to be.

Doctors initially performed surgery in darkness. Primary care and dialysis services across the island ground to a halt. People drank water from Superfund sites, and pollution and trash sprawled across the island. With many people in rural areas being exposed to contaminated water, Puerto Rico faced a fatal outbreak of the fever disease leptospirosis. Experts sounded the alarm about the mental-health problems that could emerge as residents dealt with both the trauma of the storm and recovery, and with the deaths of loved ones and friends.

New evidence details the ongoing public-health fallout from the storm over half a year later. An April commentary from Pennsylvania State University researcher Alexis R. Santos-Lozada in Health Affairsindicates just who’s been at risk in the post-Maria landscape:

“In particular, we have found that the excess deaths were concentrated among older age groups. For example,among people in Puerto Rico ages seventy and older, the death rate for the period September–October was 27 percent higher in 2017, compared to previous years. Excess deaths were also concentrated in nursing homes (where the numbers of deaths were 45 percent higher in 2017 than in 2016) and emergency departments (where there was a 41 percent increase)”

A comprehensive analysis released Tuesday by the Kaiser Family Foundation  finds evidence of significant progress since last winter, but also some lingering problems settling in. A series of interviews with residents and other stakeholders found a heavy reliance on temporary shelters and tarps among many Puerto Ricans, continuing financial instability, and disruption of daily health-care. The sole constant for many people is that there are no constants; no real ability to set health-care routines and engage in healthy behaviors.

The most recent blackout again disrupted lives, while exposing thousands to hazardous pollutants. “I was in Ponce and the sewage water was flooding the area,” recalled Ruth Santiago, an environmental lawyer at the Inter American University Law School in San Juan. “Schools are out. Courts are closed. The big mall is closed … The water pumps stop working because there’s no electricity, so raw sewage [was] backing up.”

The rolling blackouts and damaged infrastructure are just one component of the health-care situation. The Kaiser Family Foundation report highlights the accelerating outmigration since the storm and the resultant aging and sickening of the island’s population.“The Puerto Rican government projects a 10.9% cumulative decline in population over the six years following the hurricanes,” it said. An NPR story finds that among the remaining elderly residents, access to long-term support and nursing is declining.

KFF also reports that the physical health needs of those remaining on the island have increased since the storm. While major outbreaks have been contained or averted, “some individuals experienced worsened chronic conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, due to gaps in care and medications following the storms.” With reduced access to quality food, exercise, and healthy lifestyle choices, stress-linked conditions like ulcers, orthopedic problems, and weight gain are increasing in prevalance. Other reports find that dialysis patients—especially in rural places where local hospitals have been destroyed or incapacitated—are facing worsening outcomes.

Perhaps the most alarming finding is the increased burden of mental-health problems following Hurricane Maria. KFF found “sharp increases in depression, anxiety, panic attacks, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among the communities they serve.” Again, these problems heavily affected the most vulnerable. “Some interviewees pointed to ongoing emotional struggles among children, noting that some become very fearful and cry every time it rains,” the report notes.

Mental-health professionals are noticing a marked increase in suicides. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, “from November 2017 through January 2018, a crisis hotline run by Puerto Rico’s Department of Health received 3,050 calls from people who said they had attempted suicide, a 246% increase compared to the same time last year. In the same three-month period, the hotline received 9,645 calls from people who said that they had thought about attempting suicide — an 83% jump from the same time last year.” These findings are supported by a March story from Quartz, which found suicides up by a third compared to the same time period in 2016.

This slowly unfolding public-health crisis lacks the drama of the major outbreaks predicted in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Maria, but presents tremendous challenges. Still, it remains possible that an improved financial plan and outlook, along with increased access to sustainable energy, assistance from the federal government, and massive public-health campaigns from the Puerto Rican government, could combine to right the ship.

The progress that has been made, though, is extraordinarily fragile. Puerto Rico simply cannot abide another hit from a hurricane while it recovers. Historical luck is on its side—for being smack dab in the middle of the Atlantic’s hurricane alley, it’s faced remarkably few direct hits from major storms over the past few decades—but the fate of public health on the island depends mostly on the hope that those historical winds keep on blowing. It’s unclear if Puerto Rico will even know how many people died from the last hurricane season before the next one begins in June.

@cbenespanol @CaribBusiness The commonwealth fiscal plan was certified. Sole dissenter was Board Member Ana Matosantos

  The commonwealth fiscal plan was certified. Sole dissenter was Board Member Ana Matosantos

Hedge fund manager bets that Puerto Rico will drag insurer under – Insurance Business


Insurance Business
Hedge fund manager bets that Puerto Rico will drag insurer under
Insurance Business
Greenlight Capital founder and president David Einhorn is betting that bond-insurer Assured Guaranty’s stocks will fall in connection with the insurer’s business in Puerto Rico. During a presentation at the Sohn Investment Conference, Eihorn – known 
Hedge fund manager David Einhorn is betting against Assured GuarantyCNBC
Greenlight’s Einhorn says shorting shares of Assured GuarantyReuters
Assured Guaranty Issues Statement in Response to Critique by Greenlight CapitalBusiness Wire (press release)

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