M.N.: This story only confirms my thesis posted earlier: The FBI is very sick and deeply dysfunctional organization in need of urgent and radical reforms. | Feds Won’t Release Details of Settlement With FBI Agent | Connecticut News | US News

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The FBI is very sick and deeply dysfunctional organization

This story only confirms: The FBI is very sick and deeply dysfunctional organization in need of urgent and radical reforms. The Russians and the others were able to operate practically and almost openly right under their noses, undeterred. For example, the leading Russian mobsters, Mogilevich and Ivankov lived openly in Trump Tower, while the FBI was “looking for them”. The list of similar “achievements” is long, just like the many lists of their self-inflated, puffed-up “heroism”. Various games, performances, smoke and mirrors, pretensions and vanity, acting and lying, psychopathic abuses of Law – these are the names and the keys to their FBI careers. No wonder… 

The issue of penetration by mobsters, in various shapes and forms, by the hostile intelligence services, and the “insider threats” are always on the agenda. This is very logical in this type of the working environment and working milieu. No wonder… 

“Nearly every examiner in an elite FBI forensic unit gave flawed testimony in almost all trials in which they offered evidence against criminal defendants over more than a two-decade period before 2000. Of 28 examiners with the FBI Laboratory’s microscopic hair comparison unit, 26 overstated forensic matches in ways that favored prosecutors in more than 95 percent of the 268 trials reviewed so far.” They did that because of the need to succeed, need to please, possibly because of the fear of losing their jobs sometimes, “peer pressure”, etc., etc.; you name it. No wonder… 

In the U.S.? And this is the famed US Justice system? This looks and feels like a third world country phenomenon, socially, psychologically, and the work ethics-wise. And this is the FBI’s fault, and the product of its institutional structure, culture, and mentality. 

If not for this story we would never learn what was going on in the Connecticut branch of the FBI. What is going on in the other branches? 

What is going on in the Puerto Rico branch? It is the responsibility of every citizen to keep the close eye on them, to document, to report, and to expose in media their each and every misdeed. They have to be purged thoroughly until they are squeaky clean. Or there will be no Liberty

Image result for September 2013 - UNLEASHED AND UNACCOUNTABLE

“The American people have entrusted the FBI with the tremendous task of enforcing the law, fairly and without favor. That trust has been well placed.” 

Or was it? It looks that this issue, with all the related practical ramifications, is exactly the crux of the discussion. I think that the question mark would be more appropriate under the circumstances: 

Is trust in the FBI well placed? And what can be done to enhance the FBI functioning and to enhance this trust, as the result? The respect for the social institutions is not the blind love, after all. 

“In its current time of trial, the FBI is deeply fortunate to have someone of Christopher Wray’s fine character and caliber at its helm. History, and the American people, will remember and record the decisions we make when our institutions are tested. I have every confidence that the FBI will pass this test with flying colors, and continue to live up to the high ideals expressed in its creed—fidelity, bravery, and integrity.” 

This part I would like to agree with; in time, and according to the real achievements and results, tangible (“structure”), and not so tangible, such as institutional culture and psychology. Time will show. 

Michael Novakhov

5.30.18 

__________________________

The Associated Press

FILE – In this Feb. 4, 2015 photo, Special Agent in Charge Patricia Ferrick, right, speaks at a news conference in New Haven, Conn. As they fight allegations that Connecticut FBI agents retaliated against employees for whistleblowing, federal government officials are refusing to release details of a legal settlement with a special agent and asking a judge to throw out another employee’s lawsuit. Special Agent Kurt Siuzdak’s lawsuit, filed in 2014, exposed allegations of internal strife and dysfunction within the FBI’s main Connecticut office in New Haven. (AP Photo/Dave Collins) The Associated Press

By DAVE COLLINS, Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — As they fight allegations that Connecticut FBI agents retaliated against employees for whistleblowing, federal government officials are refusing to release details of a legal settlement with a special agent and asking a judge to throw out another employee’s lawsuit.

Special Agent Kurt Siuzdak’s lawsuit, filed in 2014, exposed allegations of internal strife and dysfunction within the FBI’s main Connecticut office in New Haven. It also disclosed a 2013 visit to the New Haven office by then-Director James Comey, who apologized to employees for “the failure of the FBI’s executive management to correct the leadership failures” in Connecticut.

Siuzdak’s lawsuit was reported settled in court documents filed in March, but the FBI and Justice Department have declined to release the details and rejected recent requests under public records laws by The Associated Press for a copy of the deal. Officials would say only that there was no admission of wrongdoing in the settlement.

Federal officials are now battling another lawsuit by a second New Haven FBI employee, electronics technician Omar Montoya, according to court documents obtained by the AP. Montoya alleges the retaliation against him included his supervisors falsely labeling him an “insider threat” to the FBI, which sparked an investigation, and authorizing unwarranted surveillance of him.

Siuzdak and Montoya have declined to comment on the lawsuits, which were filed in federal court.

Officials at FBI headquarters in Washington and Patricia Ferrick, the special agent in charge of the New Haven office since 2013, also declined to comment on the lawsuits.

Thomas Spina, an assistant U.S. attorney representing the New Haven FBI office, said Justice Department policy prevented him from commenting on pending litigation and releasing details of settlements with employees. In court documents, federal officials denied the allegations in both lawsuits.

“We take the allegations seriously,” Spina said.

Montoya sued the FBI, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and FBI Director Christopher Wray in September. He said Ferrick and other supervisors began a campaign of retaliation against him after he began helping Siuzdak with Siuzdak’s internal complaint against Ferrick and other officials for alleged discrimination and retaliation. Montoya was Siuzdak’s volunteer equal employment opportunity affairs counselor.

Siuzdak, a 21-year FBI veteran, sued the Justice Department on allegations that Ferrick and her predecessor, Kimberly Mertz, blocked his pursuit of several management positions and started baseless internal investigations against him after he reported alleged workplace time and attendance fraud.

Montoya, an Army veteran hired by the FBI in 2010, said the retaliation and harassment against him began shortly after he interviewed Ferrick and Assistant Special Agent in Charge Kevin Kline in April 2015 as part of Siuzdak’s internal complaint, according to his lawsuit.

Montoya also had reported alleged abuse of power in the New Haven office to national FBI officials, which he said upset New Haven FBI leaders.

He said FBI New Haven officials authorized unnecessary surveillance of him, gave him bogus bad performance reviews and threatened to fire him on false allegations of attendance policy violations.

His lawsuit also said officials caused a “fraudulent and frivolous ‘insider threat’ investigation” to be started against him, by labeling him as someone who posed a “physical, terrorist, intelligence, or other security risk to the FBI.”

He said the stress from the retaliation and harassment caused health problems that made him miss work.

“He was discriminated and/or retaliated against and subjected to a hostile work environment because of his participation in civil rights,” Montoya’s lawsuit says.

In court documents, federal prosecutors denied Montoya’s allegations and asked a judge to dismiss the lawsuit.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

FILE – In this Feb. 4, 2015 photo, Special Agent in Charge Patricia Ferrick, right, speaks at a news conference in New Haven, Conn. As they fight allegations that Connecticut FBI agents retaliated against employees for whistleblowing, federal government officials are refusing to release details of a legal settlement with a special agent and asking a judge to throw out another employee’s lawsuit. Special Agent Kurt Siuzdak’s lawsuit, filed in 2014, exposed allegations of internal strife and dysfunction with

Source: Feds Won’t Release Details of Settlement With FBI Agent | Connecticut News | US News


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