11:12 AM 3/4/2018 – Crackdowns on drug dealers led to rise in violent crime, study finds

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“Police crackdowns to cut the supply of illegal drugs by removing dealers and criminal overlords actually lead to rises in drug-related violence, gun crime and murder, according to an international study. A review of 20 years of research into drug enforcement has found that attempts to snuff out the trade in illegal substances have the opposite effect to that intended,

by creating a power vacuum when drugs barons are imprisoned which is rapidly filled by competitors eager to fight each other for the newly-vacated territory.” 

______________________________

“The [current Pesquera’s] anti-crime plan

is an initiative that adds to the total daily effort made by the Police Bureau to enforce the law and order, as reported. It consists of the

Intensification of preventive surveillance and the specific development of criminal investigation to remove the leaders and components of criminal organizations from circulation. 

The priority areas are those that in some way have a higher incidence of crime and gradually extend the application of the strategies successfully implemented to the other areas to cover the entire Island.” 

Satisfied Pesquera with the work of the Police 

________________________________

M.N.: This is exactly, and paradoxically, as described above,  leads to the exacerbation of violence. Speaking generally with regard to the anti-drug operations, the attitude “Let them (the drug dealers) kill each other”, if it exists, might be in fact counterproductive, in addition to being morally, ethically, and legally unacceptable.

Links 

Drug lords Puerto Rico – GS

The heightened risk that Puerto Rico will become a new base for …

thehill.com/…/358779-the-heightened-risk-that-puerto-rico-will-become-a-new-base-f…

Nov 4, 2017 – They can build or bolster a relationship with the existing Puerto Rican traffickers, and cement it with their own “reconstruction assistance.” Ships and aircraft that deliver reconstruction material to the island can return large drug shipments to the mainland. Corrupt airport employees have been useful since …

Illegal drugs in Puerto Rico – Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegal_drugs_in_Puerto_Rico

In the 1970s the increase in drug use, particularly among those under the age of 25, became a major concern in Puerto Rican society. A number of drug cartels have used Puerto Rico as a transfer point while trafficking cocaine to the mainland United States.

Total violent crime‎: ‎239.9
Homicide‎: ‎26.2(2011)
Total property crime‎: ‎1,498.5
Aggravated assault‎: ‎78.8

What Is Puerto Rico’s Role in the Drug Trade? – Newsweek

www.newsweek.com/what-puerto-ricos-role-drug-trade-362372

Aug 15, 2015 – Sent as express mail through the U.S. Postal Service, the contraband was cached in five “gift-wrapped boxes and packed alongside children’s toys,” the officials said this week. Each box contained a kilo of coke. This wasn’t the first time traffickers sending drugs between Puerto Rico and New York City have …

Under Pressure from the Drug Cartels, Puerto Rico is Collapsing

https://canadafreepress.com/…/under-pressure-from-the-drug-cartels-puerto-rico-is-col…

Apr 24, 2014 – In July 2010, an investigation by the US-DEA and the Puerto Rico Police Department resulted in a federal grand jury indictment for 158 people on heroin, crack, cocaine, and marijuana drugtrafficking charges, as well as firearms related offences. It was the largest ever federal law enforcement operation in …

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Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks 11:12 AM 3/4/2018

Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks

By Cahal MilmoChief Reporter

Felipe Narváez Colón – Google Search
Arrestan en Orlando a líder de ganga Los Menores | Ley y orden
Satisfied Pesquera with the work of the Police
Los Menores Puerto Rico – Google Search
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Pesquera insists on 45 days http://bit.ly/2tdiaGu pic.twitter.com/zDGsWIbjAv
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They will create experts in fraud and corruption
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Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks

Crackdowns on drug dealers led to rise in violent crime, study finds

By Cahal MilmoChief Reporter 

mikenova shared this story .

Police crackdowns to cut the supply of illegal drugs by removing dealers and criminal overlords actually lead to rises in drug-related violence, gun crime and murder, according to an international study. A review of 20 years of research into drug enforcement has found that attempts to snuff out the trade in illegal substances have the opposite effect to that intended, by creating a power vacuum when drugs barons are imprisoned which is rapidly filled by competitors eager to fight each other for the newly-vacated territory.

Campaigners for the reform of drugs policy said the findings, which follow numerous studies showing that prohibition has failed to stop narcotics from becoming more plentiful, added to the pressure on governments to declare the “war” on the £200bn global illicit drugs industry over, and adopt a policy of controlled legalisation.

The study by the Canada-based International Centre for Science in Drug Policy (ICSDP) found that heavy-handed tactics, ranging from attempts by the American-sponsored Colombian armed forces to eradicate drug cartels to the arrest of dealers in Sydney, had led to increases in violence. Often, this violence is fuelled by criminals arming themselves to profit from price rises caused by seizures of drugs or the dismantling by police of dealing networks.

The assessment of 15 reports on the relationship between violence and drug enforcement, presented yesterday at an international conference in Liverpool, found that 87 per cent of studies reported that police seizures and arrests led directly to increased violence.

Dan Werb, co-author of the ICSDP document, said: “The convention has been that law-enforcement action to reduce the availability of drugs, thereby increasing drugs prices and decreasing supplies, also has the effect of reducing violence. Not only has prohibition been found to be ineffective with regard to price and supply; this study has also shown that it is accompanied by an increase in drug-related violence.

“Prohibition drives up the value of banned substances astronomically, creating lucrative markets and worldwide networks of organised crime. Unfortunately, the evidence suggests that any disruption of these markets through drug-law enforcement seems to have the perverse effect of creating more financial opportunities for organised crime groups, and gun violence often ensues.”

The study, which highlights the drug-related violence gripping Mexico as an example of the vicious circle fuelled by crackdowns, said

researchers in Florida had recorded a five-fold increase in violence and property crime linked to drug arrests.

Another study of six US cities found that attempts to shut down crack markets led to increased homicide rates in four of them.

A six-year Australian investigation into drug dealing in Sydney found that the arrest of dealers and subsequent disputes between rivals had contributed to murders and a substantial rise in non-fatal shootings with handguns.

Campaigners for a regulated market in drugs said the study bolstered the argument for legalising drugs and introducing a sliding scale of controls, ranging from membership of coffee-shop style premises for the sale of cannabis to licensed pharmacies selling cocaine.

A spokesman for the Transform Drug Policy Foundation said: “We have a government in pathological denial of the negative impact of a prohibition-based drugs culture. Which other global industry worth £200bn is left in the hands of organised criminals rather than being taxed and properly regulated?”

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Felipe Narváez Colón – Google Search
 

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Story image for Felipe Narváez Colón from El Vocero de Puerto Rico

Arrestan en Orlando a líder de ganga Los Menores

El Vocero de Puerto RicoFeb 9, 2018
Agentes del Task Force de los Alguaciles Federales de la Florida y del Negociado Federal de Investigaciones (FBI), arrestaron esta tarde en la ciudad de Orlando a Felipe Narváez Colón, líder de la organización de narcotraficantes conocida como Los Menores. Narváez Colón fue arrestado en el hotel La …
Arrestan en Orlando a líder de ganga Los Menores | Ley y orden
 

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Agentes del Task Force de los Alguaciles Federales de la Florida y del Negociado Federal de Investigaciones (FBI), arrestaron esta tarde en la ciudad de Orlando a Felipe Narváez Colón, líder de la organización de narcotraficantes conocida como Los Menores.

Narváez Colón fue arrestado en el hotel La Quinta, número 7931, en Orlando Florida.

A este se le ocupó $5,700 en efectivo, una licencia de conducir de Puerto Rico con un nombre ficticio y una tarjeta de Seguro Social falsa.

El arrestado estaba acompañado por una fémina que fue dejada en libertad posteriormente.

Narváez Colón será extraditado próximamente.

La pandilla Los Menores fue desarticulada el pasado 9 de enero. Esta era integrada por un total de 32 personas y operaba en el residencial San Fernando, en Río Piedras, desde 2011.

De acuerdo al pliego acusatorio, la organización distribuía crack, heroína, cocaína, Percocet y Xanax a mil pies de una escuela pública. Trece de los acusados enfrentan cargos por posesión de armas de fuego en relación a un delito de trasiego de narcóticos.

El grupo enfrenta una confiscación de $10 millones.

Los acusados tenían diferentes roles: líderes, dueños de puntos de drogas, gatilleros, corredores, procesadores de drogas, vendedores y facilitadores.

Se alega que los acusados, en ocasiones, forzaban a residentes de los que se sospechaba cooperaban con las autoridades a abandonar sus apartamentos.

Asimismo, sacaban de sus viviendas a personas que no obedecían sus reglas y a residentes que se negaban a pagarles “una renta” a los líderes de la ganga.

El caso está a cargo de la fiscal, Vanessa Bonhomme.

Satisfied Pesquera with the work of the Police
 

mikenova shared this story .

The Secretary of the Department of Public Security (DSP), Hector Pesquera, and the interim commissioner of the Police Bureau, Henry Escalera, reported on Wednesday that during the month of January the anti-crime plan implemented with 209 arrests in the six police areas where the strategies of the plan are active.

In addition, a decrease of almost 20 percent was reported in Type I crimes throughout the Island in this same period.

This year, there have been 26 murders more than last year for the same date. 

I have explained that in the 209 arrests are prominent criminals in criminal organizations, in the transfer of drugs, responsible for murders, robberies and other crimes.

I have explained that among the main leaders of drug trafficking, Edwin Jaffet Hernandez Vázquez, known by Jincho, of the Cuban organization have led to triggerman in the Gardenias residential complex in Bayamón and with federal probation, was arrested. Luis R. Reyes Jimenez, known by Popeye, also part of the organization of Cuba and co-administrator of the Alhambra residential in Bayamón and member of the gang “Los Menores.” Also from the group of “Los Menores”, Juan Gabriel Pérez Rivera was arrested and Héctor E. Martínez García, known by Richy Tamba, who, in addition to the nearly 70 arrests, that the police made along with the federal authorities, to members of the “The Minors” organization.

In San Juan, two of the leaders of Monte Hatillo, Joseph Marte Rodriguez, known by Matta and Lennyn Santiago Hernández, who had three arrest warrants, one federal and two state ones, were arrested. Another of those arrested was Joshua Campos, known as Chuky and Bebo, leader of the Vista Hermosa residential and a fugitive from federal authorities since 2014.

During the month of January there were 25 raids, of which 19 were positive. The Bureau of the Police seized a total of 58 firearms, 3 thousand 621 ammunition of different calibers, 110 magazines of ammunition, 2,012 bags of synthetic marijuana, 51 marijuana cigarettes, 18 marijuana plants, 11.5 pounds of marijuana, 223 flakes of synthetic marijuana, 3 thousand 097 crack capsules, 83 crack bags, 1,259 bags of cocaine, 15 cocaine flakes, 1 kilo of cocaine, 545 grams of cocaine, 601 heroin decks, 106 bags of heroin, 11 ounces of heroin and 1,768 controlled pills. Meanwhile, a total of $ 72,663 was spent in cash.

On the other hand, the total amount of the bonds imposed after finding cause for arrest adds up to a total of $ 26.7 million.

The results of the anti-crime plan presented correspond to the first month of the year 2018 implemented in the police areas of San Juan, Bayamón, Carolina, Caguas, Fajardo and Humacao.

Likewise, as part of the actions to attack crime on the Island, Type I crimes and crimes against property have been maintained with a constant decrease since last year. Until February 15 of this year, there is a significant reduction in Type I crimes with a minus 19.8 percent and at least 16 percent offenses against property compared to the same period last year.

Meanwhile, for the year 2017, Type I crimes were at least 9.1 percent, while crimes against property were at least 11.4 percent compared to 2016.

“The Bureau of the Police remains focused on the implementation of the strategies that are being implemented in the anti-crime plan to deal with crime. The committed and strategic work is focused on dismantling and removing from circulation the criminals that alter our communities. I am sure that we will continue consistently seeing results like the ones we are presenting today, “said Secretary Pesquera.

“We are satisfied with the work done, although I acknowledge that there is much more to be done.” These results are part of one of the strategies put into action in the anticrime plan, we have a good work pace and that must be highlighted so that citizens know. that we are not going to lower our guard against these criminals who threaten the tranquility of everyone, investigations continue, we will continue to refine our plans to fulfill our mission to protect lives and property, “said the Commissioner.

The anti-crime plan

is an initiative that adds to the total daily effort made by the Police Bureau to enforce the law and order, as reported. It consists of the

Intensification of preventive surveillance and the specific development of criminal investigation to remove the leaders and components of criminal organizations from circulation. 

The priority areas are those that in some way have a higher incidence of crime and gradually extend the application of the strategies successfully implemented to the other areas to cover the entire Island.

Check out our live progress here 

M.N.: This is exactly, and paradoxically, as described above,  leads to the exacerbation of violence.
Los Menores Puerto Rico – Google Search
 

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Story image for Los Menores Puerto Rico from Fox News

Puerto Rico turns to DOJ amid escalating post-Maria drug-fueled …

Fox NewsMar 2, 2018
Last month, a federal grand jury indicted 104 people they claim are part of a drug cartel operating in Puerto Rico. The defendants – some as young as 14 years old – are accused of murder, drive-by shootings as well as intent to distribute drugs. The arrested belong to the Los Menores gang – or the “new …

Story image for Los Menores Puerto Rico from Telemundo New York

Telemundo New York

Satisfecho Pesquera con el trabajo de la Policía

Telemundo Puerto RicoFeb 28, 2018
Luis R. Reyes Jiménez, conocido por Popeye, también parte de la organización de Cuba y coadministrador del residencial Alhambra de Bayamón y miembro de la ganga “Los Menores“. También del grupo de “Los Menores”, se arrestó a Juan Gabriel Pérez Rivera y a Héctor E. Martínez García, conocido …

Story image for Los Menores Puerto Rico from Primera Hora

Hallan varias violaciones en guagua que cruzó menores por río de …

Primera HoraMar 1, 2018
Los inspectores declararon la unidad fuera de servicio al no cumplir con los requisitos para poder operar. … a la Ley del Código Federal 7470 de Transporte Comercial, al trasladar un vehículo escolar con estudiantes a bordo a través de un río en el municipio de Morovis, en centro norte de Puerto Rico.
Puerto Rico turns to DOJ amid escalating post-Maria drug-fueled violence
 

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Forensic worker moves a body at a San Juan crime scene in January, Puerto Rico’s deadliest month in recent years  (Associated Press)

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico – Just a half hour from the charming cobblestone streets of Old San Juan loom the boxy World War II-era public housing projects, now home to thousands of residents trapped in a post-Hurricane Maria dystopian nightmare of crime and corruption.

Police appear powerless to stem a spiraling murder rate, donations rarely seem to reach the public and the government’s answer is most often to blame Washington. Families that a year ago enjoyed the trappings of upper middle class huddle indoors with scant food and sporadic power, while armed young men roam the streets enforcing a brutal code borne of social breakdown.

“We are scared, of course, but this is where we live – this is our home now,” said 72-year-old Sebastian Mercado, who moved with his wife Ana to the suburb of Trujillo Alto when their home was destroyed and they were unable to flee the island.

Mercado, a former mathematics tutor, says most of his friends have migrated to the mainland – Florida and New York – to be with family. Now, he spends his days longing for the not-so-distant time when he played dominoes with friends, danced and enjoyed Sunday night dinners of Arroz con gandules – Puerto Rican rice with pigeon peas and pork.

“The boys walk around with big guns. The drugs. Too much violence.”

– Sebastian Mercado, 72

Fear dominates his nights.

“The boys walk around with big guns. The drugs. Too much violence,” he said, shaking his head.

The damage from Maria has led to job losses, foreclosures and an increase in murders, robberies and carjackings. The increasingly vicious nature of attacks adds to the climate of fear.

On Feb. 4, police officers arrested Adriel Carrasquillo-Carmona after he stole a 70-year-old man’s gray 1988 Oldsmobile Cutlass. Carrasquillo-Carmona bashed the septuagenarian in the head and body with a sledgehammer multiple times before reaching inside the man’s bloodied pockets to take his cell phone and $800.

In this Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018 photo, a forensic workers takes notes at the scene where a man was found fatally shot, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. As the Island struggles to recover from Hurricane Maria, it is facing one of the biggest spikes in violent crime in nearly a decade amid a widespread power outage, severe unemployment and an increase in police absences. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

Forensic worker takes notes at the scene where a man was found shot to death in San Juan  (Associated Press)

News of the brutality terrifies law-abiding residents like the Mercados who are caught in the crosshairs of violent gangs battling it out daily for street supremacy.

Over the weekend, another five people were gunned down and another injured outside a bar in Comerio, 20 miles southwest of San Juan. The men killed were between 20 and 34 years old. A 17-year-old boy was wounded in the shootout.

Since the beginning of the year, there have been nearly 130 killings reported in the U.S. territory. A majority are thought to be drug-related.

“The fights that they have – the drug turf wars – they want to control drug points and turn complete areas (housing projects) into something very violent,” Rosa Emilla Rodriguez-Velez, U.S. Attorney for the District of Puerto Rico, told Fox News.  “In one specific area, you have 10 to 15 drug points. That’s one owner – and gangs compete for that. They end up killing each other.”

Fernando Soler, vice president of a police officers’ advocacy group, told The Associated Press, drug dealers are “taking advantage of all the situations occurring in Puerto Rico.”

“There’s no power and they believe there’s a lack of police officers…,” he said. “Criminals are taking care of business before the hurricane.”

Last month, a federal grand jury indicted 104 people they claim are part of a drug cartel operating in Puerto Rico. The defendants – some as young as 14 years old – are accused of murder, drive-by shootings as well as intent to distribute drugs.

The arrested belong to the Los Menores gang – or the “new blood.”

“We are calling them ‘the minors’ because they are the ones who took over from some really big guys we arrested and convicted from the mid-to-late 2000s,” Rodriguez-Velez said.

US Attorney for Puerto Rico Rosa Emilla Rodriguez-Velez says the storm-driven chaos has made crime worse

At the time, the Department of Justice didn’t target minors for drug violations so those caught were either given a warning or at most a slap on the wrist.

“Ten years later, these were the kids that we left out there,” Jacqueline Novas-Debien, Executive Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Puerto Rico, told Fox News. “They grew up and took over.”

The vicious new breed of thugs started expanding their turf out of Puerto Rico’s housing projects by any means necessary.

Members allegedly plotted to smuggle and sell cocaine, heroin, crack and marijuana near Bayamon, a municipality located on the northern coastal valley. Los Menores routinely used force, violence and intimidation to gain control of most of the public housing projects in the area after federal authorities locked up leaders from nearby gangs.

The top dogs would instruct lower-level thugs to shoot and kill suspected rivals – the bloodier, the better.

The group would also pay crooked cops to look the other way or bribe them for information on informants or other law enforcement plans to infiltrate the gang.

Of the 104 criminals indicted, 22 were leaders or drug point owners; 9 were enforcers; 13 suppliers, 13 runners, 42 sellers and five drug processors.

While the Los Menores bust is no doubt impressive, authorities on the ground tell Fox News their resources are strained as new drug leaders eager to take advantage of the post-Maria conditions set up shop.

It’s gotten so bad that Florida Sens. Marco Rubio and Bill Nelson have asked Attorney General Jeff Sessions to get involved, and the Department of Justice has promised to help.

“(Attorney Genera Sessions) understands that for Puerto Rico to rebuild, people have to have safety and peace of mind,” DOJ spokesman Ian Prior told Fox News. “He recognizes that, to accomplish that, federal law enforcement has a special role to play. The people of Puerto Rico can be sure that Attorney General Sessions and the Department of Justice are working to help secure their communities so that they can recover and rebuild.”

That’s good news to Mercado.

“If it happens, we’ll be happy,” he said, gesturing to Ana. “Let’s see how long it will take.”

Relatives comfort each other as the body of a family member is removed at an early morning crime scene, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018. While the number of homicides did not immediately spike in the weeks after Hurricane Maria struck on Sept. 20, police and independent experts say many killings appear at least partly related to its aftereffects. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

Relatives comfort each other as the body of a family member is removed at an early morning crime scene in San Juan  (Associated Press)

Pesquera insists on 45 days http://bit.ly/2tdiaGu pic.twitter.com/zDGsWIbjAv
 

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Pesquera insists on “45 days” http://bit.ly/2tdiaGu  

Crearán expertos en fraude y corrupción http://bit.ly/2FRbHUt pic.twitter.com/CjrdD5ohDd
 

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Crearán expertos en fraude y corrupción http://bit.ly/2FRbHUt  

They will create experts in fraud and corruption
 

mikenova shared this story .

The proliferation of economic crime, among whose main manifestations is fraud and public corruption, requires a type of researcher with the adequate preparation to face this type of delinquent, for which the Interamerican University of Puerto Rico is close to initiate courses leading to master’s degree is this specialty.

In Puerto Rico there is no formal education related to this type of crime, which is different from conventional crime, said Dr. Melvin Rosario, professor at the Criminal Justice School of the Metro Campus of the Inter-American University of Puerto Rico.

“There are no certifications tempered to this type of criminal who have the rigor of a good minimum preparation,” he said.

Their expressions took place within the framework of the First International Fraud Detection Symposium: An Interdisciplinary Strategy, organized by the educational entity with the participation of international guests.

“We have realized that for us to train an individual who has the right skills to investigate economic crimes can not be just giving him criminal investigation techniques, he has to know about psychology, he has to know sophisticated interview techniques, he has to know about The Deception Detection. So this is an interdisciplinary work, universities have to consider how to improve that preparation, “said the educator.

He reported that the university proposed and is already advanced the approval process, a new master’s degree in Economic Crime Research, in addition to partnerships with institutions such as the National Institute for Fraud Research in Colombia, which was represented at the symposium.

He said that the master’s degree has already been approved by the Academic Senate of the University and will soon be presented to the Higher Education Council. “I am sure that at the beginning of next year we will have it available,” he said.

He put the initiative in perspective by stating that “this is the first economic problem that Puerto Rico has. It is not that we do not have help, it is not that we do not have an economy, it is that what we have, whatever it is, is stolen from us “.

He stressed that one of the most frequent forms of fraud, the main problem that Puerto Rico has, is corruption. “Not only is it the first problem in Puerto Rico, it is the first problem in Latin America and the Caribbean and within the first two problems of the world. The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, and there are public statistics, has told us that the first problem that the West and the eastern part of Europe have is corruption. That’s enough statistics for us to give importance to that. ”

“We are not talking about conventional crime. We are talking about criminals who are inserted in the economic process of the country. Statistically the economic cost of this crime is much higher, “he said.

Insists that it promised to restore the electric system in 45 days
 

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The promise of the US Army Corps of Engineers (Use, for its acronym in English) to restore the electrical system in 45 days was verbal and was not reflected in the document in which the government assigned to this US unit the task of repair.

The Secretary of Public Security, Hector Pesquera, who was at the meeting in which the document was signed, indicated that the estimate of the duration of the repairs came from the same Lieutenant General of the Usace, Todd Semonite. At that time, there was talk that the works would be financed with funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA, for its acronym in English) and would entail an investment of $ 87 million.

“If you put it in perspective, with the government broken, 10 days after the hurricane (September 30) and with the help of the people who built the Panama Canal (in reference to Usace), there were no doubts, at that time, That’s something possible, “Pesquera said in an interview with El Nuevo Día.

“They said they had flown over the system and they knew the magnitude of the damage,” the secretary added, showing a photo of the document that Semonite gave the governor to sign completing the formal part of the mission’s start.

It was a form that, among other things, mentions in general terms, the mission of restoring the electrical system, priority was assigned to the work and the period of emergency was specified, which would end at the end of this month, when the six were completed months of the passage of the cyclone.

Neither the form signed by Governor Ricardo Rosselló Nevares nor the one that was subsequently endorsed by another local government official to correct some formalities of the process that reparations would be made in 45 days.

“The 45 days were verbal,” said Pesquera.

Fourteen days after that meeting, Rosselló Nevares publicly promised at a press conference that the electric system would be restored by 95% by mid-December 2017. The Usace, however, indicated after the governor’s announcement that this goal was not possible due to the magnitude of the damage caused by Hurricane Maria.

Colonel Jason A. Kirk, of the Usace, has denied that it has been estimated that the repairs would last 45 days. He stressed that since October of last year, Usace has estimated that the total energization would delay until May or June of this year.

The alleged promise to repair the country’s electricity system in 45 days is the latest chapter in the distribution of blame for delays in the repair of electricity transmission and distribution lines.

Currently, around 168,000 customers of the AEE remain without electric service, some since the breakdowns associated with the passage of Hurricane Irma, which preceded Cyclone Mary for about two weeks.

As of October, Rosselló Nevares and several of his administration officials began to blame Usace for the delays in the repair of the electrical system. By then, the complaint was because the brigades they had hired were not submerged in the repair of the system and there were not enough materials.

“We are very grateful for the help. Out of the representation that was made to us (of the 45 days), we are very grateful … It was not that someone from here or from Jacksonville told us that it would be at that time, but that it was who was in charge. If they had told us that (the delay) was because they were facing problems, well we understand that but that was not what happened, “said the secretary of Public Security.

The Whitefish effect

At that time, the administration of Rosselló Nevares was dealing with the controversy associated with the contracting of the company Whitefish Energy, of the state of Montana, for the repair of the energy system. That company, at the time the cyclone passed through Puerto Rico, had barely two employees.

The AEE, then led by engineer Ricardo Ramos, chose to give Whitefish Energy a contract, instead of activating the mutual cooperation agreement that members of the Public Utilities Association of the United States have. (APPA, for its acronym in English), entity to which the EEA belongs.

The controversy associated with the hiring of Whitefish Energy caused a series of pressures from the US capital that were translated on the island in bureaucratic complications in the recovery process.

He indicated, for example, that before the controversy, FEMA proceeded to make disbursements and that the state government later justified the use of the money. In contrast, now the money is disbursed by FEMA after the central government justifies and the bills go through an almost audit process.

This has affected the government’s cash flow and has limited the agility with which the work is carried out.

In fact, I have indicated that the extra hour due to the emergency that the police worked during the month of October have not been reimbursed by FEMA and that to meet the officers the money from the central government has been used, which is scarce.

“Here the rules of the game changed eleven the issue of Whitefish came up.” That’s where political pressures began and everything changed Now everything is slower, “Pesquera said.

¿Por qué Canadá se convirtió en el principal exportador de la tarántula mexicana?

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